Python

I saw an advertisement that Arduino now accepts Python.

I looked under software and saw nothing there.

How can we use Python with Arduino?

(deleted)

Arduino Playground - Python - I just did a quick search. But, didn't really understand it all.

and there is a book.

Getting Started with Arduino and Python
By Agus Kurniawan

Plus other links if you search Google for Can you use Python for Arduino

The links you posted are all about interfacing an Arduino with a python program on your computer, not writing code in Python for the Arduino to run. I think you've misunderstood. When the Arduino is communicating with some computer it doesn't know or care what language the program on the computer uses.

Perhaps you should start reading a little past just the title.

(deleted)

If you understood the difference between an interpreted language and a compiled language you wouldn't even bother to try to search to see if you can program an Arduino with Python. You would know why you can't.

If you consider an ESP8266 an Arduino you can use MicroPython to program it. At that point you're not using an official Arduino board (well, Arduino Uno WiFi maybe), the Arduino libraries, or the Arduino IDE (unless you use Serial Monitor as your terminal) so it's a bit of a stretch to say "Arduino accepts Python" based on that.

There are probably ports of MicroPython for other microcontrollers but I doubt it's feasible on an AVR.

https://www.adafruit.com/?q=circuitpython

Ok thanks for the explanation. Is there a competitor to Arduino that does use Python IDE?

I ASSUME (please correct me if I am wrong) that it is POSSIBLE to have a small board like Arduino and it be run by python. If it is not possible, would you kindly explain why?

Thank you,

Markis

SpaceAlien:
Ok thanks for the explanation. Is there a competitor to Arduino that does use Python IDE?

I ASSUME (please correct me if I am wrong) that it is POSSIBLE to have a small board like Arduino and it be run by python.

I think that question has already been answered pretty clearly. Did you read this thread and the posted links?

Sorry, I don't see answer to that. I am not a low level programmer. I have only been programming C, VB and now Python.

Can you answer? Is it possible to have a BOARD that is NOT arduino (say a competitor) that you can program using Python IDE?

You can write your Python code in any IDE you like. Boards that have native USB such as the SAMD boards (Arduino Zero, MKRZERO, Adafruit M0, etc.) will show up as a flash drive on your computer once you have installed the CircuitPython or MicroPython firmware so you can just save the Python code to the flash drive. That should work seamlessly with any Python IDE or text editor.

The ESP8266 doesn't have native USB so uploading your code to that board is done through either a virtual COM port or over WiFi. That will require either a plugin for standard Python IDEs or a specialized IDE, both of which are available.

So yes, it is possible, whether you want to use an official Arduino board or a competitor. You just need to use a microcontroller that is supported by MicroPython (ESP8266, STM32F4, ESP32, probably some others) or CircuitPython (SAMD21, ESP8266). It really doesn't matter who makes the board as long as it has the right microcontroller. You can buy some with the MicroPython or CircuitPython firmware pre-installed and the ones sold in cooperation with the MicroPython or CircuitPython developers do support further development work but it's easy enough to flash any board with the firmware.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

I am sorry I am a newbie and didn't understand the previous post. I appreciate the time you took to explain it to me in detail. There were some words you mentioned that I didn't understand like microcontroller and others but I will look them up on internet before asking any more questions.

Again, THANK you for helping a newbie like me.

Glad to help and you will find tons more information on this topic on the MicroPython and CircuitPython sites:

https://learn.adafruit.com/adafruit-feather-m0-express-designed-for-circuit-python-circuitpython/circuitpython-setup
https://learn.adafruit.com/category/circuitpython
I'm actually not very knowledgeable about this topic. I'm involved with a Python-based open source automation software project so there was some buzz about MicroPython on the ESP8266 in that community a while back. I flashed my WeMos D1 Mini ESP8266 with the firmware, played around with it for a while, then realized that I'm actually way better with C++ than Python so there is really no benefit for me that makes the performance penalty of running the interpreter worthwhile. For someone who's better at Python it could be great. The thought is also that Python is more beginner-friendly than C++, which I suppose is true, though I don't think C++ is really so difficult as some people make it out to be.

Regarding microcontroller, definitely take the time to research what that means in relation to Arduino. That's an essential bit of knowledge. Basically the microcontroller is the chip that acts as the brains of the Arduino board. The Arduino boards have their own names but more important is the model number of the microcontroller chip the board is based on (which are the things I talked about in my previous reply). For example, the Arduino Uno and the Arduino Nano may look very different but they both use the ATmega328P microcontroller so mostly the difference is just the form factor of the circuit board that the microcontroller is soldered to. Your code will essentially run the same on either board. The same holds with Zero vs. Adafruit M0 (SAMD21G18), or the WeMos D1 Mini vs "NodeMCU" boards (ESP8266).

pert:
The thought is also that Python is more beginner-friendly than C++, which I suppose is true, though I don't think C++ is really so difficult as some people make it out to be.

Popular Micropython boards are the Pyboard and the micro:bit. For a beginner the usability of these implementations of Micropython far exceeds the almost painful implementation of Micro Python on the ESP8266 and ESP32. The ESP32 Micropython port is not yet complete.

You can now program the micro:bit in the Arduino IDE, in C\C++.

I hope one day Arduino really accepts Python, as I am seriously planning to learn this programming language. It's popularity is growing daily, and the salaries of Python developers are very decent (up to 116$ sometimes according to this article ). The demand for Python programmers grew up crazily due to new technologies like IoT and machine learning.

JeromBaines:
I hope one day Arduino really accepts Python, as I am seriously planning to learn this programming language. It's popularity is growing daily, and the salaries of Python developers are very decent (up to 116$ sometimes according to this article ). The demand for Python programmers grew up crazily due to new technologies like IoT and machine learning.

Your Post suggests to me that you don't understand the important differences between a computer with an operating system and megabytes of RAM and a microprocessor with no operating system and 2k of RAM.

If you want to make progress as a programmer you should learn the difference. You won't be worth $116k if you don't know the difference.

And, once you are familiar with programming in any language it should not be difficult to program in a different language.

...R