Rf remote control attiny, battery, long lasting

Hi, i want to build a rf remote control for my backyard water pump.

I want the remote to be as easy as it can so my parents will understand it quickly.

As input i want to use either 1 single switch either 2 push buttons, no switch for the power, because everyone will forget to close it and the battery will run out quickly even if the arduino will sleep.

Also... I want to somehow boost the voltage for the rf emitter module so it will be powerful, i thought about using one of the pins for the switch of the boost converter in combination with a inductor and a cap.. Only to power the rf module for one message, on or off

And remember i'm using attiny board which will drain more current the nano in sleep even if i remove the regulator and the led.
It will be nice if there is a solution which the arduino qon't be connected to power all the time

The rf module is a chinise one 433mhz

the battery will run out quickly even if the arduino will sleep.

Not true. Most AVR processors can be powered for years by a coin cell, if you follow the design rules.

See https://www.gammon.com.au/power

jremington:
Not true. Most AVR processors can be powered for years by a coin cell, if you follow the design rules.

See https://www.gammon.com.au/power

I know about the atmega385p but don't know about Attiny85 (digispark board)

Then your course of study is clear!

Like the ATMega328p described in Nick Gammon's excellent article, the ATtiny85 will run for years on a coin cell, using almost all of the same approaches. See the ATtiny85 data sheet.

jremington:
Then your course of study is clear!

Like the ATMega328p described in Nick Gammon’s excellent article, the ATtiny85 will run for years on a coin cell, using almost all of the same approaches. See the ATtiny85 data sheet.

let’s imagine that i can make digispark attiny to consume as less as the 328p, now i can use buttons to send a On signal and an OFF signal, but how i can boost the voltage for the transmitter (12V max, 40mA, <10ms signal send time) ? and then, can i use my 3.6-4.1V arduino to with it ? (XY-FST - name of the transmitter)

Since the transmitter will be used only very infrequently, just use a 9V block battery or 6/12V cylinder cell to power it.

Those 433 MHz transmitter modules draw no current when not triggered (when the DATA input is LOW).

jremington:
Since the transmitter will be used only very infrequently, just use a 9V block battery or 6/12V cylinder cell to power it.

Those 433 MHz transmitter modules draw no current when not triggered (when the DATA input is LOW).

I want to use a li-ion battery so i won't need to use an regulator which will have a quiescent current too, beside the attiny

And my question is still here ? i'll be able to pull the data input HIGH with my attiny voltage (3.6-4.1) if the module will be powered by 12V ?

3V on the DATA input will activate those TX modules, regardless of the TX power supply voltage.

jremington:
3V on the DATA input will activate those TX modules, regardless of the TX power supply voltage.

Then, this is great!, i was thinking that it's working like a mosfet were the voltage need to be equal
Anyways, it is possible to boost the voltage to 12V and store it into a small cap for the rf module to consume ?

Yes, if you want to waste battery power.

jremington:
Yes, if you want to waste battery power.

So, what is the best solution in your point of view ?
I want to build it and don't know what to start with ?

I want to somehow boost the voltage for the rf emitter module so it will be powerful

You have no evidence that this is needed.

Build it and get it to work first.

Just follow the design rules from nickgammon's "power" post. I have and powering a ph sensor for 8 mounths.