Rf remote not receiving anything

Hey guys,
I recently bought a 10pc set of receivers and transmitters (https://www.amazon.ca/UCEC-XY-MK-5V-Transmitter-Receiver-Raspberry/dp/B07415XCSD/ref=sr_1_10?ie=UTF8&qid=1534771338&sr=8-10&keywords=rf+module ) for a project I'm working on that involves decoding a fireplace RF remote. I have tried to run the RCswitcharduino code, both simple and advanced, to just get the unique codes for the buttons but nothing ever shows up on the Serial monitor. Could it be that the transmitter of the remote and the receiver that I bought are non-compatible? If that is not the case, what do you think could be the issue?
thanks

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"Could it be that the transmitter of the remote and the receiver that I bought are non-compatible? "

Did you not compare the specifications of both before you ordered? Could also be the witch in the fireplace. With no information provided on the remote, how could anyone help?

Paul

I checked the frequency of both the remote and the receiver and they are both 315MHz. That is really the only specification that matters. What do you mean by the switch in the fireplace?

Briskgotmethrough:
I checked the frequency of both the remote and the receiver and they are both 315MHz. That is really the only specification that matters. What do you mean by the switch in the fireplace?

Witch, not switch!

The modulation method matters, as well as the data format and the actual protocol used.

Paul

Those receivers are utter garbage, especially at <5v. The RXB12 and RXB14 (both around a buck each on ebay, super cheap) are much better receivers, and work at 3.3 too. Order of magnitude improvement in range or more compared to the crappy green ones (at 5v - at 3.3v, the green ones straight up don’t work). Sometimes the kind you have gets into a state where it won’t receive anything, too (a failure mode that goes away when it’s unpowered and left alone for a while, and tends to be triggered by receiving signals at short range - presumably a defect in the AGC that can only be fixed by letting the caps discharge…).

Do you know that the receivers and transmitters you ordered are actually 315mhz? I have twice gotten receivers of the wrong frequency (they look so similar - it’s not hard to see how the mistake occurs).

Do you know that the remote control is currently working?

If it is, either your transmitter is so lousy that it isn’t picking up the signal or is for 433mhz, or it’s using a protocol that the library you’re using doesn’t know how to decode. because of how OOK data transmission and the AGC circuits in these receivers work, the program listening to the receiver needs to have an idea of what to expect in order to interpret what it receives, since it has to pick it out of the random noise output by the receiver when there’s no signal (the AGC adjusts the sensitivity to get ~50% duty cycle output; if there’s no signal, it will increase the gain until ambient noise gives 50% duty cycle).

The transmitter on that remote is definitely an OOK 315mhz transmitter, so this ought to work, with the caveats above.

If the receiver and transmitter are sold as a set then they should be compatible…IF you are using them correctly. But from that Amazon link we have no information about how they should be connected or used. Do you have a link to a datasheet for them?

And did you see the reviews on that page? One said he couldn’t get them to work and another said some worked, some didn’t.

Steve

@slipstick - that's not what he's doing, as I read his post.

He's trying to use that receiver to receive data from his fire place remote control (shown in picture) which also uses 315mhz OOK

And yeah, your comment about the reviews sounds about right (probably the people with problems are experiencing the bad-state behavior that I mentioned above). I've gone through a bin of receivers, found like half didn't work. But after letting them sit and trying again, some of the units that previously didn't work worked, and vise versa. It's maddening; Those receivers are unfit for purpose - and the ones that came out best in my tests (as of a few years ago) are only 50 cents more expensive (beating out the $3~7 modules, and the $40 domestic one) - it's a shame people keep selling that crap, when the good ones are so cheap.

Briskgotmethrough:
I checked the frequency of both the remote and the receiver and they are both 315MHz. That is really the only specification that matters.

Interesting view.

How much experience do you have of RF type stuff and different modulation methods ?

srnet:
Interesting view.

How much experience do you have of RF type stuff and different modulation methods ?

Agree in the general case - he clearly is not qualified to assert that.

However, as I said above, he has shown us a photo of the transmitter... and that is plainly a 315mhz OOK transmitter, and not a particularly spiffy one (if he were to trace out the circuit of his transmitters, and that one, I wager they are nearly identical). more sophisticated modulation schemes would require a more advanced transmitter than that. With a decent receiver, and the right arduino code, he 100% should be able to read the data - at the moment, I think he's using crapola receivers and probably code that won't know how to interpret the signal sent by the remote.

Right now I'm trying this tutorial that doesn't use any of the libraries so hopefully it works:

http://arduinobasics.blogspot.com/2014/07/433-mhz-rf-module-with-Arduino-tutorial_30.html

it's still for 433mHz but I think it still might work with 315mHz, not sure though.

it's still for 433mHz but I think it still might work with 315mHz, not sure though.

sp. "it's still for 433MHz but I think it still might work with 315MHz, not sure though."

What does "sp" mean?

Briskgotmethrough:
What does "sp" mean?

"Spelling"

There are a number of variations of the RC-Switch protocol and the available libraries don't work for all of them. The fact that your receiver doesn't respond to the signal used by your fireplace switch controller doesn't mean much, as the transmitter may not even use the RC-Switch protocol.

The cheap superregenerative receiver you have will work fine at short range, if it has a 23 cm antenna.

Follow the methods described in this blog article to verify reception and analyze the switch signal, using Audacity on a laptop. No Arduino required at this stage.