Single Axis Camera Stabilizer

Gurus do you think it possible to help me with a project. I wish to build a device to stablize a small camera in one axis.
The platform will tilt about 35 degrees from horizontal.
I have seen several (youtube)but without Kindergarten help I will not be able to complete this, there are so many Arduino boards and sensors that I do not know where to begin my purchases and of course program.
Next question, I admittedly do not know how to interface and program so any help again would have to be at a beginner novice level.
I am fascinated with how freakin smart you all are and would love to be able to join in on the fun even if at a low level.
Thank you to all and I truly appreciate you taking the time to read this.
Mark

Can you provide a link to a YouTube example?

What do you mean by stabilize?

It might mean just keeping the camera roughly horizontal, or it might mean the equivalent of the image stabilization that is built into many cameras?

How is the camera mounted?

If occasional large adjustments are needed this may be a simple enough project. On the other hand if you are trying to eliminate camera shake for slow shutter speeds it could be very complex.

...R

This is pretty close to what I would like to build but only need one axis.
The camera is a GoPro and was hoping to use it on a motorcycle to appreciate the lean of the bike thru corners.
Super picture quality is not really the goal, Good would suffice (Roughly Horizontal)

mjpcarbon:
hoping to use it on a motorcycle to appreciate the lean of the bike thru corners.

That's fairly easy to do with a stationary object, just using a two-axis (or one-axes) accelerometer to measure how level the platform is. However, that approach doesn't work for a moving platform and you would need to use gyros to detect changes in orientation. Gyros are prone to drift over time and you would need to have some scheme to keep them zeroed - perhaps by using the accelerometer to slowly creep the platform back to an apparent horizontal level, and make this slow enough that it doesn't mess things up in corners. Depending how much of this you want to buy versus make, one option would be to use the Arduplane software and hardware 'gimbal' mode.

I do have an Arduino in one of my quadcopters, can it be used standalone without a reciever ?
I also wondered if I could use a gyro from a plane ?

Nice video.

But I'm confused in a different way now. If the camera on a bike is always horizontal how will you know the bike is leaning over?

...R

mjpcarbon:
I do have an Arduino in one of my quadcopters, can it be used standalone without a receiver?
I also wondered if I could use a gyro from a plane ?

Well, the gyros in your quadcopter or a plane are exactly what you would be using for this purpose. Arduino-based guidance systems such as the Multi-Wii are very popular and many modules are sold for this very purpose.

What you will need, is an adaptation of the firmware to suit what you want to do.

This is what I would like to do but don't have the smarts to do

Robin this will show you the lean pictures I want

The instructable appears to have a lot of details. What are you hoping to get from the forum, on top of that?

Joshua, I guess from your comment I am in way over my head and should concede defeat.
I read thru that several times and it still doesnt give me direction Although loaded with parts and details to a beginner it means nothing.
I had hoped there would have been a doable solution for me.
I can probably physically build it but doubt I could progam the unit.
What is a Saklar shown in one of the pictures
thank you
Mark

mjpcarbon:
Joshua, I guess from your comment I am in way over my head and should concede defeat.
I read thru that several times and it still doesnt give me direction Although loaded with parts and details to a beginner it means nothing.

I hope that you're able to figure it out, but if you need more hand-holding than that tutorial, you probably should postopone this project and get back to fundamentals. Start working through the tutorials at Arduino Tutorial - Learn electronics and microcontrollers using Arduino! for example.

I can probably physically build it but doubt I could progam the unit.

It looked to me like the instructable included code. It may be as simple as uploading their code to an Arduino and boom! It magically works! You never know...

What is a Saklar shown in one of the pictures

I'm not sure what you're referring to.

OK. I hadn't envisaged the bike being visible in the on-board pictures. They look good. I hope you can ride as well or you might regret it :slight_smile:

I agree with Joshua - you need to get to the stage where you understand the Instructables project. I often find these things make more sense after the 7th or 10th reading (literally). Take it slowly. If there is a specific piece you can't figure out post a link to it here with a question.

If you can afford it then I suggest you buy all the parts listed in the Instructables project and follow along. But if you are new to Arduino make sure you learn enough from the Arduino tutorials not to fry something by a silly mistake.

...R

Thanks to all so where is the best place to learn the tutorials ? The above link ?

This is what I was referring to Saklar

A couple more questions before I leave you all alone.
Good place in the US to buy the parts shown ?
Is that code shown to be copied and uploaded ?

Thank you

Saklar = power switch (Google!) in Bahasa Indonesia.

If you think you can power a servo from the 5V regulator on an Arduino - or indeed from one of those 9V batteries - you have a lot to learn (the hard way!).

(You need a separate battery pack of 4 AA Alkaline cells.)

Paul thanks for the translation and I know I am in the dark and want to learn, unfortunately that is why I have to ask so many dumbass questions.
There has to be a starting point somewhere for me.

I agree with Paul - the power system in that Instructables diagram is useless for the application. The servo is going to be very busy and will need a good sized battery to keep it going. 4xAAbatteries will be fine for development, but you may decide later to power it from the bike with a suitable voltage regulator - but leave that for the future.

A good place to start is to buy an Uno, some resistors - 1k is usually a good all rounder and a few leds. With that you can learn the basics of programming the Uno. Then you could get a 4xAA battery pack and a servo and learn how to wire that up and how to control a servo. At that stage the program on the Instructables site may make more sense. (I hope it's better than the proposed power system).

...R

Would I be better served buying one of the starter kits and if so which one ?

I started off with this one:

IMO, it has a good assortment of basic stuff, without trying to be everything-but-the-kitchen-sink. Other starter kits I saw included bunches of stuff that I wasn't interested in playing with.

I suggest buying a full-size breadboard as well. The starter kits typically come with a quarter-size breadboard, which you will very quickly outgrow.

As you start to branch out, a multi-value resistor kit is a much, much better value for money than buying individual resistors piecemeal. For example:

You would also do well to pick up a pack of a few hundred, or a thousand, of whatever value resistor is most commonly used with LEDs on your power source voltage. For an Arduino running at 5v, a resistor between 220 and 1000 Ohms is a good choice. A higher-value resistor will result in less power used (good for battery life) but dimmer LEDs. A lower-value resistor will use more power, and your LEDs will be brighter. I personally use 220 Ohms.

joshuabardwell:
A lower-value resistor will use more power, and your LEDs will be brighter. I personally use 220 Ohms.

I am most embarrassed to have quantities of LEDs bought back in the “early days” (when they had coloured encapsulation).

They are absolutely useless!

Paul__B:
I am most embarrassed to have quantities of LEDs bought back in the "early days" (when they had coloured encapsulation).
They are absolutely useless!

I'll date myself by saying that I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about.

Actually, I'm only dating myself as an electronics hobbyist. In absolute years, I'm no spring chicken.