stepper set up to replicate power of an 18V brushless motor drill

I'm working on a project I'm hoping to mass market that in it's current form uses a brushless motor 18v drill as a power source- something like this, for instance--

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-18-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Brushless-1-2-in-Compact-Drill-Driver-Kit-with-2-1-5-Ah-Batteries-Charger-and-Bag-R86009K/206955210

Since this is a product for woodworkers, many will already own a suitable drill, and the product is inexpensive, so not having to buy a power source will make it much more attractive.

But some may want to use my product more vigorously and more hours than is sensible for a drill.

I'm looking for help assembling a package of stepper, controller and power supply that will replicate or exceed the drill's power in the speed range of about 10-100 RPM's at a price that won't be prohibitive, and that I (someone unversed in things electronic) can package and document so the average woodworker will be able to assemble and use it.

Or is this better accomplished with a DC motor?

Willing to compensate the right person for help here.

Does your device weigh the same or less than that drill and battery?

The drill, with the battery weighs almost exactly 4 lbs (1.8 kg). How that breaks down is the drill by itself weighs 3 lbs (1.36 kg), and the battery alone weighs 1 lb, (or 0.45 kg).

Paul

Device weighs about 12 pounds without a power source, and will be clamped to machines weighing much more. Would like to keep the motor weight within that same 3-5 pound range, and the controller and power supply would probably be best unattached to the device, mounted in a separate box.

The high torque generated by a battery powered drill/driver is a combination of a high current high torque electric motor and a gear train with a large step down ratio from the motor to the output shaft.

My guess (not having taken a working drill/driver) is that as well a high torque the DC motor is quite fast. Stepper motors are generally not capable of high speeds unless powered with high voltages (maybe 60v to 80v). Even if you do find a suitable high torque stepper motor that works at 18v it will be expensive and heavy and it will also need an expensive and bulky stepper motor driver and a suitable Arduino program. You should also be aware that you cannot control the torque of a stepper motor, whereas you can with a DC motor.

IMHO for this application it would seem a lot more sensible to choose a high power brushless motor. It should be much easier to implement than a stepper motor. If the system works well when powered by a drill/driver then it hardly needs the positional precision for which stepper motors are intended.

…R

endgrainguy:
I'm working on a project I'm hoping to mass market that in it's current form uses a brushless motor 18v drill as a power source- something like this, for instance--

https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-18-Volt-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-Brushless-1-2-in-Compact-Drill-Driver-Kit-with-2-1-5-Ah-Batteries-Charger-and-Bag-R86009K/206955210

Since this is a product for woodworkers, many will already own a suitable drill, and the product is inexpensive, so not having to buy a power source will make it much more attractive.

But some may want to use my product more vigorously and more hours than is sensible for a drill.

Cordless electric drills are very high power density, using high power density motors. Steppers are very low
power density and cannot compete at all with a drill motor.

Steppers spin much more slowly too, drill motor 18000rpm, stepper maybe 1000rpm (with torque dropping rapidly with speed).

For more power you need a more powerful motor, and drill motors can be several 100W, so you are looking for horse-power rated motors.

The more obvious route is powerful RC brushless motors which are available to kW levels of power.

Thanks for this clarification. I had been thinking at the rpm range I need (10-100 or 150 RPM) steppers might make sense, but the opinion here seems clear.
I'm also finding the subject of speed control and power in DC motors confusing too, but at least with this input I can dismiss the stepper option.

This is still something denizens of these depths know about, right? Any one up for the job of designing (for mass marketing), a dc brushless motor, speed control and power supply package to replicate the functionality of an 18V brushless motor cordless drill in its 10-150 RPM range?

You can buy Electronic Speed Controllers (ESC) for brushless motors. They are compact and relatively inexpensive. Have a look at the huge range of motors and ESCs on the Hobby King website.

An ESC can be controlled by an Arduino using the Arduino Servo library.

...R