Using an RF TX and RX safely

Hi, i am planning to make a remote control for an esc (to run a motor) , my question is how can you ‘protect’ the communication between the receiver and the transmitter from outer disturbance?
i have ordered a 433mhz rx and tx (STX882), is it good?
Is the nRF24l01 better? thanks!

I think the nRF24 has more in-built error checking. However its range may not be as long as the lower frequency 433MHz system the 2.4GHz wireless can be seriously affected by walls and trees.

I use nRF24s for radio control for model trains and if you are controlling something in clear line of sight and at a short enough distance that can see it clearly then you should have no problem.

No wireless system can be immune from interference. In my system I send messages about 8 times per second and if the receiver fails to get a message over the course of about 1 second it shuts down the motor.

...R
Simple nRF24L01+ Tutorial

Hi, my use for this is running an electric skateboard, so range and clear line of sight are not a problem as i am always on the skateboard :slight_smile:

What i want to know is, what will happen if i will be near some device which also transmits 433mhz\2.4ghz, will my receiver suddenly listen to the other transmitter? or the TX and RX have their own signal modulation?

The link doesn't work, but i will try to look for tutorials.

Thanks :slight_smile:

It’s nearly impossible that the other device will send a “piece” of signal exactly equivalent to something like full throttle unless it’s another transmitter programmed like yours… Anyway, there are many tutorials for electric skateboards like GreatScott’s, JoopBrooking’s and so on, you should at least read/watch some of them before trying to create one yourself even though I think you should copy one from the internet.

I watched some videos about electric skateboards, for example GreatScott's, but no one talked about unifying the transmition, you say its not needed?

Shouldn't i send some value for the Rx to read (Verify it is the value from my Tx) and only after that send the throttle's value? (in a loop).

thanks

asaf123098:
What i want to know is, what will happen if i will be near some device which also transmits 433mhz\2.4ghz, will my receiver suddenly listen to the other transmitter? or the TX and RX have their own signal modulation?

I would use a pair of nRF24s for your application.

The nRF24s need to be given an address and there are 2565 possible addresses.

The chance of another device using the same address as you have chosen is vanishingly small. What is more likely is that interference from another device could cause your signal to be garbled.

The link doesn’t work, but i will try to look for tutorials.

If you mean the link I gave you in Reply #1, I just tested it and it works.

…R

You're right, it works now.

Thanks you both for your help!!!

I do not think that you need to go so far with the data you are receiving, it is nearly impossible to receive a valid data as a result of interference. You are likely to receive corrupted values...

caiopoit:
You are likely to receive corrupted values...

I think it so unlikely as not to be worth considering the possibility of an nrF24 receiving a message that it considers to be valid but which has incorrect data.

Interference will simply mean that it does not receive a valid message.

...R

So theoretically the 433mhz should also be fine right?

asaf123098:
So theoretically the 433mhz should also be fine right?

Probably, but I have no experience of them.

The question you have asked here (about the comparative risk of interference) is one that can really only be answered by someone who has done thousands of back-to-back comparison tests in a real-world situation.

Even with all those tests behind you there is no guarantee that you won't encounter an anomalous situation.

...R

Whilst a low cost AFSK module might work, they are fixed frequency.

So you can find that there is a lot of activity (interferance) on the frequencies they use as quite a lot of other UHF devices use the same frequencies.