100A motor contol with arduino

I need to control (speed and direction) of a 1.5HP 12v DC motor. If my calculations are correct, I need a 100A motor controller -- and that leaves very little service factor.

I'm looking at these type Controllers on Amazon

Has anyone used one of these?

Is there any reason I couldn't cut the Potentiometer out of this and just apply a PWM signal from an Arduino?

I am pretty sure I could remove the "knob pot" and put in a "digital potentiometer," but I wanted to skip that and just send the PWM into the controller rather then the "pot" voltage." Would that work? or do I need to just plan on using a "Digiat Potentiometer?"

I have experience with the Digital pot on 3-phase VFD's, so I can do it using them.
I have some I use to control 3-phase AC motor VFD's,

Is there any reason I couldn't cut the Potentiometer out of this and just apply a PWM signal from an Arduino?

Any number of reasons, but to figure out which particular one would cause that approach to fail, you would need to reverse engineer the controller circuit. Start by measuring the voltages on the control pot terminals.

I use this one on an electric cart, as it was intended to be used. It works as advertised, but lacks a "coast" mode, which is a pain. That is, when you dial down the speed, the motor acts as a very effective brake.

Its typical for motor controllers to detect open-circuit on the throttle potentiomer, so you
have to be a bit cleverer and replace the pot by a resistor to simulate the track, and also
separately provide a control voltage to the "wiper" terminal.

This is an important safety feature to prevent out-of-control motor if a wire were to break.
You should be considering safety cutouts and fail-safe design in your project too...

@MarkT Thanks for the response. I'm gonna do some bench tests...

For anyone who reads this in the future, If I don't respond back then I was unsuccessful - that doesn't mean it's impossible, it just that I couldn't do it.

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