4-20ma to arduino

Actually i want to use pressure transmitter of honeywell with arduino
PX2CG1XX025BSCHX----model no.
it is 2-wire device
it is a 4-20ma device that means it gives signal in form of current
and it operates on 24V

so i want to know how to do get the 4-20ma from this 2 pin connector(i.e. i want to know the physical connections)
and i also want to know whether converting the signal to 1-5v by using resistor is good or i should use a specific IC?
if IC then try to specify the IC

(deleted)

spycatcher2k:
And your google is broken?

I can get IC no. for converting to voltage from google but physical connection of the sensor(pressure transmitter) no body tells, i tried on youtube also
if your google can fix i will be thankful to u a lot

You will need to provide 24 VDC to the transmitter over the signal wires. That is how a two wire transmitter works.

Then you will need a precision 250 ohm resistor to convert the signal to 1-5 VDC. You can read that on an analog pin.

30 seconds of googling found a data sheet that said the transmitter would work from 8V to 30 VDC.

There are two links. The first shows how were to power the transmitter on the two wires.

The second it a topic on this forum for the same issue.
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=105703.0

Exactly what "nathancamp" said and if you Google harder you will find your device has the DIN connection Pin 1 being RTN and Pin 2 supply.

nathancamp:
You will need to provide 24 VDC to the transmitter over the signal wires. That is how a two wire transmitter works.

Then you will need a precision 250 ohm resistor to convert the signal to 1-5 VDC. You can read that on an analog pin.

30 seconds of googling found a data sheet that said the transmitter would work from 8V to 30 VDC.

There are two links. The first shows how were to power the transmitter on the two wires.
Fundamentals, System Design, and Setup for the 4 to 20 mA Current Loop

The second it a topic on this forum for the same issue.
[SOLVED] 4-20 ma sensor reading - Sensors - Arduino Forum

thnks a ton, i am somewhat new for this DIN connectors and all next time i will google it hardly :-p

wow !

you guys are rude.... Yes, some people are lazy or don't think of Google, but you were pretty fast on the trigger !

Sometime Google will simply flood you with possibilities or answers, and a simple hint on where/how to get started might be what's needed.

jasmino:
wow !

you guys are rude.... Yes, some people are lazy or don't think of Google, but you were pretty fast on the trigger !

Sometime Google will simply flood you with possibilities or answers, and a simple hint on where/how to get started might be what's needed.

I did not mean to come across as rude. Maybe I should have said a quick google search on the transmitter model number instead of a 30 second search.

(deleted)

I use a 250 ohm from analog in to ground and a 300 ohm in line with the signal out from the pressure transducer just incase your power were to short to the signal and a zener diode to protect the input.
Using a map function to scale the reading. Works well. Using an ads1115, I use a 200 ohm instead of the 250 and a 5.6 volt zener.

jasmino:
wow !

you guys are rude.... Yes, some people are lazy or don't think of Google, but you were pretty fast on the trigger !

Sometime Google will simply flood you with possibilities or answers, and a simple hint on where/how to get started might be what's needed.

Google will give you a more direct more accurate and more complete answer on a request such as this and any of us would be able to type into a response

Google's great at finding the simple tutorials. "Just use a 250 ohm resistor" is good advice to get something working on the workbench. But there's very little real-world advice. How do you protect your Arduino from a doofus like me who hooks it up backwards? What if someone is doing maintenance on the sensor with the power on and brushes the two wires together? Then your Arduino gets raw 24V.

A MAX14626 chip is able to protect against some - not all - of these types of common errors. If I have a 4-20mA project that's expected to work outside my workbench for more than a week, then I'll use that chip and everything else I know about fault protection.

What if someone is doing maintenance on the sensor with the power on and brushes the two wires together? Then your Arduino gets raw 24V

That is why I put a 300 ohm resistor in line and use a zener to pass the voltage to ground if the wires are shorted. I have put 28 vdc to my circuit and nothing burned doing this just to see because so many times I see the old techs short the wires to see if the wiring is OK. The 300 ohm will limit the current enough that it does not burn out the zener yet the 4-20 mA will pass through it OK without skewing the reading. The zener is between the analog in and ground.