analog switch idea or suggestion?

I wanted to build something like this one: How-To: Make a solid-state A/V switcher | Engadget but be a bit smarter. I wanted to have LCD display that can show current selected system and have buttons to select other system, and Arduino would then switch the inputs as needed.

The problem is the switching IC used in the link above is very tiny. I have fat fingers and no SMD soldering experience. I couldn't find a larger DIP equivalent so would any of you know a substitute that is more compatible with us fat-fingered people? Or know of sources for something that passes for 5 pole normally open solid state relay or reed relay?

I could always fall back to using rotary switch but it won't be able to do LCD display showing current system.

Geez, what clod solders wires right to the legs of pins? Get real.

I could always fall back to using rotary switch but it won't be able to do LCD display showing current system.

Perhaps you should explain just what you want to do in stead of saying "something like this". Seems what you want will have several different parts that will need to be sorted out.

74HC4051
74HC4052
74HC4053
74HC4066
74HC4067

CrossRoads:
Geez, what clod solders wires right to the legs of pins? Get real.

Admit it, we've all done it at some point...

zoomkat:

I could always fall back to using rotary switch but it won't be able to do LCD display showing current system.

Perhaps you should explain just what you want to do in stead of saying "something like this". Seems what you want will have several different parts that will need to be sorted out.

With the rotary switch option, I have a pair of 6p12t rotary switches. I wanted to build switch box that handles a bunch of game systems and more to a single TV but the largest single switch box with S-Video and composite support only goes to 5 devices and I'd have to chain up a few to get all I wanted in.

The second one would control component for modern game systems (excluding PS3 it's on HDMI) and DVD player.

What stands is the common connection on the switch goes to the video "OUT" port for TV hookup, and each of the input would go to one of the 12 position. Composite, Chrome, Luma, audio L, audio R, and ground would go to each separate deck of the switch. Separated ground would be needed, if I took the cheap way and tied all the ground together, 12 devices plus TV cable, average 3', 5 ground lines per = almost 200 feet of continuous ground link, I doubt the FCC would like that :confused:

I'd do schematic but Eagle didn't have a neat solution for 6p12t, it'd take me a while to hand draw one, so I hope my description is enough.

If I can get analog IC working, someone suggested a few above and 4066 variant might work the best without wasting too much unused inputs. Arduino would control by toggling which of the chip gets enabled, in which the selected video would get passed through to TV out. The other inputs would need to be blocked to reduce any chance of interference. The only concern is the bandwidth. Audio might poass through OK unless one hooked it to a very good high end sound system and can hear any problem. Video is much higher bandwidth, I think 1Mhz for S-Video and composite and higher for component.

Arduino will also control a small LCD panel (something like 1x8 or 1x16) that will show the game system selected. The listing will need to be programmed in. ie if it selects video input 1, display "NES", if it selects input 2, sidplay "SNES", "Genesis", "TurboGrafx16", "PSX", "Atari2600", etc. Probably add a concealed photodiode so if it detects very dark (night time, lights out), then off LCD's backlight LED. I'd need to use I2C for the LCD and button so I'd have enough I/O to control video switching chips.

So I'd need to know of ideal chip that won't choke on video and audio signal and can be controlled by Arduino. 12-systems to one TV switch box with Composite and S-Video plus another with Component (maybe not 12 but minimum 6)

FWIW a few of my game systems also has RGB but RGB was rarely used in USA and most TV don't support it. RGB to component converter exists but it's pricey and 320x240 games isn't going to look that much better with RGB and $100 adapter than with S-Video on my 32" TV

fungus:

CrossRoads:
Geez, what clod solders wires right to the legs of pins? Get real.

Admit it, we've all done it at some point...

guilty... and sometimes it can look cool while being extremely fragile: Arduino Skeleton - Look Mom, no PCB! - Make: I usually avoid PCB-less hack unless it's a very small one like piggybacking a 14 pin TTL IC onto ROM chip or something to fix a minor issue. It's rare, I usually leave the PCB-less design to one transistor and few passive components.

Should be a lot easier...

Or a more direct link

Might also look at analog switches like DG407 or DG406 for selecting 1 of 8 or 1 of 16 devices.

available at digikey.com

Many other analog switch chips are also available.

DG406 looks good, the spec seems to support video signal with ONE problem. I can leave a few extra pins unused in case I need to add more in the future. 5 of these chips seems less messy than 10 or 12 of the 4066 I was looking at earlier.

One problem: DG406/7 requires 12v to run and Arduino isn’t designed to go over 5v thus I’d need to add shifter between Arduino and the address pin of DG406/7

Ah well, a few chips for me to experiment with to see what seems to work and not end up a convoluted mess of hook up wires.

From Maxim's data sheet
"The DG406 is a 1 of 16 multiplexer/demultiplexer and the DG407 is a dual 8-channel multiplexer/demultiplexer. Both muxes operate with a +5V to +30V single supply"

How'd you decide it needed 12V?

Must have been a different one. The one I found via Google seemed to suggest 12v minimum, 44v max. I'll recheck and re-verify. If it can run at 5v, it'd be easier.

The spec I downloaded is from Intersil and it never made clear the operating voltage but used 12v to 15v a lot in examples and in characteristic tables.

+/-12V to 15V for analog signals. 0-5V for digital.

Typical video and audio signal is 1v p-p or less (which comes to about 0.35v rms)

Then you probably want +/-5V for power, not just 0-5V.