arduino simulator drawing

can you help me…
I am new in arduino projects
what the best free arduino simulator?
that I can draw & to connect the board, arduino, wire
and which the link to download it??
I’ve try many links but doesn’t work

the display that showed like the attachment below,

a1.png

The software that generates those pictures, is Fritzing (click !).

It is however by my best knowledge not a simulator, just some program to compose some schematics like drawings (most people used to actual CAD software, hate the results of Fritzing).

While Fritzing is 'nice' to display a WIRING DIAGRAM.. it is NOT a schematic.
(although I think maybe the later version allow you get a PCB produced from the Fritzing file)..

as mentioned this is NOT an emulator/simulator of any sorts.

For simulation, perhaps try:

Many people like it.. (I have only used it once myself though)

The main problem with a simulator is the limitation in the sorts of external components you can add. For example a pot is seldom supported.

This link compaires various simulators

Form your post I don’t think you are after a simulator. They take a lot of learning and understanding to use properly.

If what you are after is something to draw schematics (circuit diagrams) and perhaps printed circuit boards, the most popular free software seems to be Eagle. Fritzring is very confusing and it is difficult to follow a diagram someone else has made.

Russell.

A photo/graphic of a freehand drawing of a circuit is often the quickest way.

Hi, try this “https://123d.circuits.io/lab” Thus is a free graphical Arduino Simulator which seems to work well for simple sketches. That picture Is from this simulator (99% certain). 123 is a mechanical cad company which is trying to move into the electronics cad market by offering some good tools for free. Get them now while they are still free.

That's a branch of Autodesk, the market leader for mechanical CAD since the 1980s. They are now also offering their flagship 3D CAD system, Fusion 360, free to hobbyists.

Russell.

xl97:
While Fritzing is ‘nice’ to display a WIRING DIAGRAM… it is NOT a schematic.
(although I think maybe the later version allow you get a PCB produced from the Fritzing file)…

Fritzing does have a schematic editor in it - they don’t have any tutorials about it posted, but it is mentioned. I found this instructable, though:

I’ve never understood the dislike of Fritzing among people here. No, it isn’t Eagle, or KiCad, or gEDA (to name just a few) - but it’s concept is, IMHO, a great idea.

It gives beginners a tool to allow them to learn how the relationship between a breadboarded circuit, its schematic, and its PCB layout all relate to each other. Furthermore, it’s fully open-source, and new parts to expand the library can be created fairly easily (many can be made just by copying and pasting an existing part, and updating an image file to two - others will require some knowledge of a vector drawing program, like Inkscape).

What I find really nice about it (what little I’ve played with it), is that when you make a change in one view (say you move a trace in the PCB view) - it updates the other views as well. Granted, this process (nets and routing) isn’t perfect - things will not just magically work all the time - but I’ve yet to see a schematic editor or PCB layout editor that did work perfectly all the time (I imagine something out there exists that comes really close - if you are willing to mortgage your house for it - IOW, those tools aren’t meant for hobbyists).

But there’s the other thing about Fritzing - if it isn’t working properly, it’s open source, so it can be fixed, if you have the skills or inclination (just like the Arduino IDE - in theory). If you need a new part, you can build it easily (to a point) - it’s just XML and some image files. It’s a tool which can be expanded and improved upon by the users.

While Fritzing makes it easy to get your PCBs created, they do it thru their own service - which, last I checked, is nowhere near the least expensive option. That said, IIRC, you can dump out standard file formats which most PCB houses will take (whether they will validate easily or not, though - I am not certain).

Ultimately - I personally think it is a tool that we as a community should get behind, at least to ease beginners into understanding the whole schematic/breadboard/PCB process; if there were anything that I would call a problem with Fritzing - I would have to say it’s the fact that they put “breadboard wiring diagram” view first - and not the schematic diagram view. That was a poor design decision from the standpoint of teaching newbies to electronics, because it has led to the proliferation of these wiring diagrams, and to newbies not understanding the importance of a schematic. Strangely enough, despite the view and editor being there, it also doesn’t seem to easily teach the relationship between the three views (I also have noticed how, of the three views, only the schematic view doesn’t have any tutorials for it on the Fritzing website - which is another disservice to beginners).

:slight_smile:

We don't like it because of the poor schematics. Pictures of black boxes with colored wires all over the place that tell you very little. Have to look up the chip just to see what is being connected to what.
Any schematics folks have posted have been a disaster.

"Picture of Schematic View

Fritzing creates the schematics for you as long as you’ve connected everything in the breadboard view correctly..."

And there's the problem - the design starts at the breadboard, and not the schematic. How do you know what you're connecting up if you don't have a schematic to start?

CrossRoads:
"Picture of Schematic View

Fritzing creates the schematics for you as long as you’ve connected everything in the breadboard view correctly…"

And there’s the problem - the design starts at the breadboard, and not the schematic. How do you know what you’re connecting up if you don’t have a schematic to start?

…and that’s my main criticism of Fritzing - they should have the first view be the schematic, then the next the breadboard, and finally the PCB. Honestly, it probably wouldn’t take too much to change the code for Fritzing to do this (then again, I haven’t looked at the source in detail - so it very well could be an absolute nightmare).

Maybe some discussion and encouragement on our part to the Fritzing folks might be more beneficial in the long run than simply hating on it? That - or maybe it should be forked…?

I’m not saying Fritzing should be the be-all-end-all tool for the Arduino - but I do think it presents the same kind of “friendly interface” to new users, much like the Arduino and its IDE does - which is why it seems popular with a certain segment of our users.

CrossRoads - do you also feel that the Arduino IDE is too badly designed for new users, and that they should use something more advanced and with fewer flaws? Despite both of us being around each other on these forums for so many years, I am not sure what your stance is on that issue?

I personally think - despite the flaws - that the Arduino IDE is almost perfect for the newcomer to the Arduino. I think that Fritzing could be the same thing for the physical hardware side - if that one layout order flaw could be fixed.

I have no problem with the IDE. It's the software engineers that seem to really not like it.
Thru 1.0.6, it does all I need for my not very complicated programming, with Tabs allowing me to split things up as needed. I would not prefer it to be dumbed down any. I've written some lengthy programs, and I've not been missing anything. Like I've said before, C++ just seems like fancy BASIC to me, with semicolons and no go-to statements. I'll admit to not fully using C++ and its objects, but so what?
I haven't tried the 1.5.x or 1.6.x versions; not doing anything hardware-wise past the 328/1284/2560 chips, I'm just waiting for it to settle down.

The only thing I really miss in the IDE is a proper editor, however, using notepad ++ makes up the short comings.
I also have not used anything over 1.06

.

LarryD:
The only thing I really miss in the IDE is a proper editor, however, using notepad ++ makes up the short comings.
I also have not used anything over 1.06

.

I like to use Notepad++ for my other (web) programming..

but have never used it for Arduino..

just set it to C++ lang for color/syntax highlighting then?

Do you then copy/paste into the Arduino IDE to upload? or what is your tool chain beyond that? (Notepad++)

Set the Arduino IDE to "use external editor".
Open sketch in notepad++
Open same file in Arduino IDE (you will be prevented from editing the file)
Save your work in notepad++ as needed. (save just before you want to upload)
When ready, go to the Arduino window then compile/upload.

Riva did some work to get the colours to work:
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php/topic,141050.0.html

You sir.. are a saint!

Thanks.. going to give it a try.