Arduino Simulator?

Hello guys, I'm a developer new to electronic world.

So with a good reason I'm very insecure, I would like to know if there is a good, free and linux OS simulator of arduino, is there any good one?

I found this with good options: https://windowsreport.com/arduino-simulators/

But most of them are paid and /or windows only. Also the 1st one looks pretty good but for advanced users, not an arduino focus...

I'm looking for this to have my project working 1st in virtual world, before buy all I need. So the chances are lower to burn things or buy useless components.

(edit: found 1, http://web.simuino.com I'm not lazy to search, just asking for experienced users. Maybe this one is good, maybe its a crap.)

(edit2: terrible to use it. It's like going back to 90's)

tyvm

Not exaclty what I want, but looks like it can do near what I'm looking for...

https://easyeda.com/page/download

It's much more than just arduino, and the simulation process will only simulate the circuit I belive, not the entire arduino funcionality like I was looking for...

(Edit: http://fritzing.org/download/ this one a bit simple but more what I need now)

I will keep waiting if someone knows a better free software for simulation of arduino.

Be careful with the Arduino simulators - they often don't behave the same way as the hardware. Most of the time when someone reports a problem that they discovered using a simulator on these forums, the eventual determination is that it's a simulator problem.

There's really no substitute for doing it on actual hardware.

Arduino clones are so cheap that you don't have to get too concerned about trashing one. Nano clones are what, $3? And I think it's a better learning experience using actual hardware - if you get a finished design, and then set about trying to build it, you set yourself up for a tough learning curve since you haven't done the basics in hardware.

… abnd the hardware to get started is SOOO CHEAP !
No reason to bypass the real thing. (Buy two anyway)

Teaches you about hardware mistakes as as well as software.

lastchancename: ... abnd the hardware to get started is SOOO CHEAP ! No reason to bypass the real thing. (Buy two anyway)

Teaches you about hardware mistakes as as well as software.

I totally agree with you guys. But for a unemployed guy in a 3rd world country it become a bit expensive and also very time consuming to wait any internet buy.

But you guys are right, even to memorize the things. Do the physically connections is much better. And also the problems, as any simulation, its far from the real world, its just to have an idea.

lastchancename: (Buy two anyway)

Only two?

ImNotGoku: But for a unemployed guy in a 3rd world country it become a bit expensive and also very time consuming to wait any internet buy.

Even so, you have a PC and an Internet connection. They are substantially more expensive than a Nano clone.

As said above, a little creative searching on eBay and Aliexpress should get you Nanos at $3 US each. If you are impecunious, that's a reasonable excuse not to buy the "genuine article" at five times the price or more but the experience of most of us who have good regulated 5 V supplies is that the clones (especially from Alice) are quite reliable. You will want a few extra bits carefully selected.

As to the wait, I suggest that playing with a simulator and then waiting only to find that it does not work, will prove even more frustrating! :astonished:

Atmel Studio has an integrated Simulator, which is free and nice for debugging purposes (breakpoints, read and write registers, ...). However working with actual hardware is more convenient and statisfying :)

If the OP wants to use a simulator let them, BUT do point out (as has already been done) that ANY simulator usually has issues over actual hardware - and maybe his internet connection is at a library (some of my friends only have access by the library Wi-Fi)