Controling a servo motor torque?

Hello everyone

I have a project for school and all I need is a way to control a servo motor torque? To be more clear what I am trying to do is have some kind of interface that you input a number and the servo will turn and stop at that certin torque. I know that this can be done using a current, but how I am going to control it? current sonsor? I am not good with writing Arduino programs, so an example code that can get me started would be great. I will be having a torque sensor as well to conform the toqure readings of the motor.

Thank you

Some details of, or a link to, your servo would be useful.

Regular hobby servos use their maximum torque to get to the commanded position. Normally you would choose a servo with sufficient torque to overcome any load it will be faced with. Otherwise you can’t rely on it getting to the commanded position.

I wonder if your objective is just to apply a certain torque whether you need a servo at all? Perhaps a simple geared DC motor would be more suitable?

I also suspect that reducing the voltage to the servo (tp reduce the torque) would interfere with its internal electronics. But I have never tried that.

…R

I will be having a torque sensor as well to conform the toqure readings of the motor.

What will you use as a torque sensor?

Here is a link to the motor:-
http://www.trossenrobotics.com/p/mx-106t-dynamixel-robot-servo.aspx

I will be using a torque sensor to just verify that the motor actully reached a specific torque.

The below link may have some info, Google for more.

http://www.pablogindel.com/informacion/the-arduinodynamixel-resource-page/

I think am on the right track, but still thinking about how am going to control a current for the motor to turn to a certin torque and stop?

how am going to control a current for the motor to turn to a certin torque and stop?

For typical hobby servo motor current is controlled by the servo H-briidge being pulsed by the servo's controller chip. The pulse durations are controlled by the difference between the servo current position and the servos commanded position.

What mechanical load are you going to attach to the shaft of your servo stepper motor?

If it is something like winding up the spring in an old clock, use your torque sensor to detect when the required torque has been reached and then stop the servo motor.

zoomkat: For typical hobby servo motor current is controlled by the servo H-briidge being pulsed by the servo's controller chip. The pulse durations are controlled by the difference between the servo current position and the servos commanded position.

That's a better way of saying what I was trying to get at in Reply #2

Archibald: What mechanical load are you going to attach to the shaft of your stepper motor?

SERVO, not STEPPER

...R