CY7C68013A-56 EZ-USB Logic Analyzer...?

greets

Has any of you guys used a CY7C68013A-56 Logic Analyzer?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/CY7C68013A-56-EZ-USB-FX2LP-USB-2-0-Develope-Board-Module-Logic-Analyzer-EEPROM-/400330480196?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d358e5a44

Manufacturers website:

http://www.cypress.com/?rID=38801

So this analyzer can only scan at 12 and 480 Mbps? Or does the speed depend on the loaded firmware?

What is your overall opinion on this analyzer?

"Ultra low power: ICC No more than 85 mA in any mode"

85mA is hardly ultra low! So you're thinking use the FIFO input as parallel port capture for logic analyer use?

I didn't look at the download, no idea how good the software is for displaying the captured data.

Interesting piece of hardware, The Advert did mention that 317, 326.. must have sold a few more since this thread have been sold... Somehow I find that on Ebay's pages as being very believable... Unfortunately it could have been 317 people who made the same (Mis?) calculation/Assumption that I did. I did look at the packages (3 folders in the attached Rar file) and although all I read had Asian titles the contents were in English Including a copy of the Saleae software and C code apparently for a '51 core. So I attached a copy... (it's 56M Bytes) But at $12.10 US I couldn't turn it down... I was # 318...

Doc

So you're thinking use the FIFO input as parallel port capture for logic analyer use?

I'm not sure how I will use it since I have not used a logic analyzer before.

My goal is to use the analyzer on a few devices I have. I don't know what kind of internal architecture they have but I reckon since they have USB sockets they are running at 12 and 480 Mbps, but if they run at slower speeds I might be able to use an Arduino UNO as an analyzer. There is a topic on that http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=52881.0

I got one of those and it works with the included (very old and simple) version of Saleae Logic. Haven't used it much though, just verified that it works. The recent versions of Saleae Logic doesn't work and as far as I've understood it's something about the eeprom on the board being incompatible with the Saleae software. I think that's fair enough. After all Saleae Logic is available for Saleae hardware and not for cheap clones.

I got one of those and it works with the included (very old and simple) version of Saleae Logic. Haven't used it much though, just verified that it works.

What kind of circuits did you test it on?

I got one of those

How do you upload code to it.

I must admit I'm a bit lost if I don't have Arduino IDE or at least AVRDude to do the job

Erni:

I got one of those

How do you upload code to it.

I must admit I'm a bit lost if I don't have Arduino IDE or at least AVRDude to do the job

Upload code to it ?!?!?!?!?!

AVRDude or Arduino cannot program the Cypress FX2 microcontroller (which by the way has no flash memory - it's bootloaded by the PC application upon launch - e.g. Saleae Logic)

// Per.

AVRDude or Arduino cannot program the Cypress FX2 microcontroller

I know, thats why i asked.

it's bootloaded by the PC application upon launch

OK, thanks

naut: What kind of circuits did you test it on?

I recorded serial data going to and coming from an Arduino and verified that it could pick it up correctly and present it to me in an understandable way when analyzed as asynchronous data.

perhof: I recorded serial data going to and coming from an Arduino and verified that it could pick it up correctly and present it to me in an understandable way when analyzed as asynchronous data.

That's interesting. I thought it doesn't work at slow speeds because the description reads that it only does 12 and 480Mbps, not the slow serial speed that Arduino is capable of.

Did you have to set the baud rate manually or does the Saleae Logic automatically determine the baud rate of the serial data stream?

What version of Saleae Logic did you use? There is a downloadable version Logic Software 1.1.15 here: http://www.saleae.com/downloads but it's probably not the same one you've used.

A logic analyzer can work down to DC levels. There is no lower limit for frequency.

Try have a look what a Logic analyser is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logic_analyzer

// Per.

I don't know where you read about those speeds but that's wrong. Could it have been sample rates that you saw?

I don't remember what I had to fiddle with in the software, it was a year ago. I used version 1.0.21 which was included in the package. The latest on from Saleae didn't work.

perhof: I don't know where you read about those speeds but that's wrong. Could it have been sample rates that you saw?

This is what I meant:

FX2LP operates at two of the three rates defined in the USB Specification Revision 2.0, dated April 27, 2000:

Full speed, with a signaling bit rate of 12 Mbps High speed, with a signaling bit rate of 480 Mbps

FX2LP does not support the low speed signaling mode of 1.5 Mbps.

I guess these are the rates at which the CY7C68013A-56 can communicate with the host computer?

I seriously doubt even the old version of the Saleae Logic software is legally licensed by these guys. They cloned the Saleae Logic hardware (they are using the exact same chip) and stole the software.

JoeN: I seriously doubt even the old version of the Saleae Logic software is legally licensed by these guys. They cloned the Saleae Logic hardware (they are using the exact same chip) and stole the software.

The technically didn't steal the software as it is/was available as a free download from Saleae but they are most certainly not allowed to redistribute the software so I agree with you.

perhof:

JoeN: I seriously doubt even the old version of the Saleae Logic software is legally licensed by these guys. They cloned the Saleae Logic hardware (they are using the exact same chip) and stole the software.

The technically didn't steal the software as it is/was available as a free download from Saleae but they are most certainly not allowed to redistribute the software so I agree with you.

I wonder how they went about cloning the features on the CY7C68013A-56 itself. That's the same chip Saleae uses. That implies to me they stole the firmware too. Now if they reversed engineered the hardware itself (perhaps using the logic analyzer on itself) and reimplemented it, that would be the proper way to do it. I bet they didn't - the fact it's the exact same microcontroller would allow them to take the shortcut of possibly ripping the firmware and I bet that is what they did.

I don’t think there is any firmware, or anything to reverse engineer. I’ve seen quite a few products sold as saleae logic analyzers that could double as a usbee logic analyzer. Switching between the two was supposedly just a matter of changing the device id on an eeprom chip on the back of the board via usb, and most were being sold for $5 - $10. For that price, they probably didn’t put much effort into it.

Has anyone who has one of these tried using it with open source logic analyzer software like the OLS client? If it can be used legally, it might be a pretty useful little device!

JoshD: I don't think there is any firmware, or anything to reverse engineer. I've seen quite a few products sold as saleae logic analyzers that could double as a usbee logic analyzer. Switching between the two was supposedly just a matter of changing the device id on an eeprom chip on the back of the board via usb, and most were being sold for $5 - $10. For that price, they probably didn't put much effort into it.

Has anyone who has one of these tried using it with open source logic analyzer software like the OLS client? If it can be used legally, it might be a pretty useful little device!

The concept of using a microcontroller and not having firmware is novel. Please explain how this would be done in more detail...

A quick example might be the boot code resident in the system rom of a PC.. Or the 'monitor' used on CPM machines that looked for a specific signature on a floppy to indicate the beginning of the boot code contained on the floppy... Prior to windows most all computers needed a 'boot' floppy and when a hard drive was installed (my first was 10 Megabytes on a 386-33) and when I installed the hard drive I had to edit the boot sector on it, anyone remember G 080 to go to location 80 of the drive controller bios to rewrite the drive with it's size Cylinders and Heads (It's been 35 years since I did this last and many of the details are Kinda lost... After dos 2.2 hard drives became much easier to use as there were tools created for that purpose... 100% of the first 286's and later 386's were shipped without a hard drive... most had dual 13.3 cm floppy drives. One machine I owned used the 20 cm floppies... only held about 80K as I remember. The drives were called "Winchesters" in those days. The original Winchesters were about 130 cm long and about 75 X 100 cm wide and deep... It took 2 men to carry one and a big one as I remember held 5 Megabytes. there were 2 other kinds of memory used before Sram was in use one was register storage and the other was Mag core memory little ferrite toroids that stored data they were typically about a mm across with a .3mm or there avbouts hole through which the read (sense) Write and Bias wires were threaded.. More than that I simply don't remember.

Doc