Esp8266-01 setup

I recently purchased esp8266-01 wifi serial module but i am totally confused that what is the best way to wire it up? As i have watched many tutorials on youtube everyone is wiring it differently . So i have some questions in my mind if you are know the answers please answer me i will be very thankful

1:- why everyone is not using builtin 3.3 v regulator in arduino while connecting it With arduino or programming it with arduino. Everyone is using seperate 3.3v regulator like famous ams1117 3.3 v regulator

2:- Many of them are connecting the rx and tx pins of esp directly to rx tx pins of arduino without any voltage divider and many of them using voltage divider to convert 5 v signal coming from arduino to 3.3 v

3:- Does the rx and tx pins of esp are 5 v tollarent?

4:-How to make best voltage divider using resistors for esp and which pin it would require weather rx or tx or both

5:- Use of chp_d or ch_en pin of esp

  1. The built-in 3.3V regulator of some Arduinos can source very little current, the ESP8266 draws large spikes of current when transmitting. For simply uploading code to the ESP, it might be alright, but I probably wouldn't use it as a power source for a more permanent project.

2-3. Officially, the ESP8266's pins are not 5V tolerant. OTOH, some guy from Espressif posted on Twitter that applying 5V to an input pin is fine, and many hobbyists do this without any problems (at least short term).

  1. The ESP8266's RX pin is an input, so it needs a level shifter. The ESP8266's TX pin is an output (3.3V) so it doesn't need a voltage divider.

  2. What about it? The datasheet is pretty clear. It just enables or disables the chip.

Here's what I use: https://tttapa.github.io/Pages/Arduino/ESP8266/Flashing/Flashing-With-an-Arduino.html

Pieter

avanishpratap: 1:- why everyone is not using builtin 3.3 v regulator in Arduino while connecting it With Arduino or programming it with Arduino. Everyone is using separate 3.3v regulator like famous ams1117 3.3 v regulator

Many "clones" faking as UNOs use a USB interface chip which is also the source of the "3.3 V" terminal but is not capable of supplying the current needed for the ESP8266 to perform WiFi.

avanishpratap: 2:- Many of them are connecting the rx and tx pins of esp directly to rx tx pins of Arduino without any voltage divider and many of them using voltage divider to convert 5 v signal coming from Arduino to 3.3 v

...

avanishpratap: 3:- Does the rx and tx pins of esp are 5 v tolerant?

Don't bet on it. :astonished:

avanishpratap: 4:-How to make best voltage divider using resistors for esp and which pin it would require weather rx or tx or both

Well, it is only necessary for reducing the voltage in the direction from Arduino to ESP8266. The best voltage divider is a diode with cathode to Arduino and anode to ESP8266 with a pull-up - say 1k5 - pulling up the ESP8266 input pin to 3.3 V.

avanishpratap: 5:- Use of chp_d or ch_en pin of esp

Is used to reduce power drain to negligible levels when operating from a battery.

I like the combination of the ESP-01 with its USB module, which contains the regulator. |500x500 It is more "cubic" than the WeMOS D1 Mini and plugs directly into a USB "phone charger" or in my case, mounts to the end of a "Times Square" MAX7219 display.

The ESP-01 also suits the "button" project (using the improved version with CH_PD) where it is powered by two alkaline cells.

Just as well I have a few on hand as the viral doubling in prices means I would be waiting until matters settle before buying more! :astonished:

@avanishpratap

Other post/duplicate DELETED Please do NOT cross post / duplicate as it wastes peoples time and efforts to have more than one post for a single topic.

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Could you also take a few moments to Learn How To Use The Forum. It will help you get the best out of the forum in the future. Other general help and troubleshooting advice can be found here.

ballscrewbob: @avanishpratap

Other post/duplicate DELETED Please do NOT cross post / duplicate as it wastes peoples time and efforts to have more than one post for a single topic.

Continued cross posting could result in a time out from the forum.

Could you also take a few moments to Learn How To Use The Forum. It will help you get the best out of the forum in the future. Other general help and troubleshooting advice can be found here.

sorry sir i really dont wanted to post it in two topics but when i firstly posted it in "microcontrollers" section i didnt get any reply within 4 to 5 hours thats why i posted it again in project guidance section

PieterP: 1. The built-in 3.3V regulator of some Arduinos can source very little current, the ESP8266 draws large spikes of current when transmitting. For simply uploading code to the ESP, it might be alright, but I probably wouldn't use it as a power source for a more permanent project.

2-3. Officially, the ESP8266's pins are not 5V tolerant. OTOH, some guy from Espressif posted on Twitter that applying 5V to an input pin is fine, and many hobbyists do this without any problems (at least short term).

  1. The ESP8266's RX pin is an input, so it needs a level shifter. The ESP8266's TX pin is an output (3.3V) so it doesn't need a voltage divider.

  2. What about it? The datasheet is pretty clear. It just enables or disables the chip.

Here's what I use: https://tttapa.github.io/Pages/Arduino/ESP8266/Flashing/Flashing-With-an-Arduino.html

Pieter

thank you very very much sir for helping me out

Paul__B: Many "clones" faking as UNOs use a USB interface chip which is also the source of the "3.3 V" terminal but is not capable of supplying the current needed for the ESP8266 to perform WiFi. ... Don't bet on it. :astonished: Well, it is only necessary for reducing the voltage in the direction from Arduino to ESP8266. The best voltage divider is a diode with cathode to Arduino and anode to ESP8266 with a pull-up - say 1k5 - pulling up the ESP8266 input pin to 3.3 V. Is used to reduce power drain to negligible levels when operating from a battery.

I like the combination of the ESP-01 with its USB module, which contains the regulator. |500x500 It is more "cubic" than the WeMOS D1 Mini and plugs directly into a USB "phone charger" or in my case, mounts to the end of a "Times Square" MAX7219 display.

The ESP-01 also suits the "button" project (using the improved version with CH_PD) where it is powered by two alkaline cells.

Just as well I have a few on hand as the viral doubling in prices means I would be waiting until matters settle before buying more! :astonished:

thank you very very much sir for helping me out

@avanishpratap

The forum is managed by users for users.

The people in this forum are just other Arduino users like yourself. Asking for a quick response may be like watching paint dry. Even more than a week can go before people get to see a post they can answer so just a few hours is nothing.

In some cases it puts people off helping. Remember almost all of us do not work for Arduino.

Paul__B: The ESP-01 also suits the "button" project (using the improved version with CH_PD) where it is powered by two alkaline cells.

The "button" project uses the ESP-03. What has to be modified on the ESP-01 to make it work for the project?

Also, I am not sure what you mean by your comment about the "improved version with CH_PD".

What you haven't said is what do you want to do with the ESP-01. If you are trying to add WiFi to an Uno, then you're going about it the hard way. Why not just use an Arduino compatible board that already has WiFi and a voltage regulator? Like the NodeMCU or Wemos Da Mini.

SteveMann:
What you haven’t said is what do you want to do with the ESP-01.
If you are trying to add WiFi to an Uno, then you’re going about it the hard way. Why not just use an Arduino compatible board that already has WiFi and a voltage regulator? Like the NodeMCU or Wemos Da Mini.

The most annoying thing is that the 5v and 3.3 v most common sensors like ultrasonic and Ir etc as well as Arduino is not 3.3v and the modern boards like esp32 or any esp boards are 3.3v . that makes the project even more hard than programming . The wiring and schematic creates mess and can easily destroy the boards with even little mistake.

recently i purchased a esp32 board and connected with my robot with Arduino with only rx and tx pins with 3.3 v voltage divider i dont know what happened the project runs very fine for 1 week and suddenly one week later my esp burned and i have tried everything but it didnt worked at all . Now i am frustrated and not in mood to invest money on these expensive boards . First i have to learn on cheaper ones

ieee488: The "button" project uses the ESP-03. What has to be modified on the ESP-01 to make it work for the project?

Removal of the header pins! That's basically it!

And maybe use of a common anode LED to comply with the boot conditions. Haven't got around to putting it together yet. The ESP-01 has four available GPIO, so it does fit the project with the right adaptations. :grinning:

ieee488: Also, I am not sure what you mean by your comment about the "improved version with CH_PD".

The original version requires you to hold the power button while the ESP performs its negotiations. That makes it substantially less than practical. The obvious (to me at least) improvement which someone tested for me some years ago is to use the button to pull CH_PD high and hold it high with a diode from a GPIO pin until the handshake is complete. Much more sensible than switching the power supply.

I was trying to find the circuit from my previous posts. Now that you have reminded me that the "button" did not actually use an ESP-01, with some diligence I have found my previous post with the circuit: :sunglasses: |427x500


avanishpratap: The most annoying thing is that the 5v and 3.3 v most common sensors like ultrasonic and Ir etc as well as Arduino is not 3.3v and the modern boards like esp32 or any esp boards are 3.3v . that makes the project even more hard than programming . The wiring and schematic creates mess and can easily destroy the boards with even little mistake.

So, get used to it! That is no reason to use an ATmega Arduino when what you really want is WiFi.

avanishpratap: Recently I purchased a esp32 board and connected with my robot with Arduino with only rx and tx pins with 3.3 v voltage divider I don't know what happened the project runs very fine for 1 week and suddenly one week later my esp burned and I have tried everything but it didn't worked at all.

So you should now present the details here - pictures and circuit schematic - in order to learn what you did wrong. :cold_sweat:

avanishpratap: Now I am frustrated and not in mood to invest money on these expensive boards . First i have to learn on cheaper ones

Presently, the ESP32 is excessively expensive. But you mostly do not need it, the ESP8266 is just fine.

And the ESP8266 boards such as the minimal ESP-01 and the very practical WeMOS D1 Mini are similar in price to or possibly even cheaper than Arduino clones, so they are the "cheaper ones". :astonished:

Paul__B:
Removal of the header pins! That’s basically it!

And maybe use of a common anode LED to comply with the boot conditions. Haven’t got around to putting it together yet. The ESP-01 has four available GPIO, so it does fit the project with the right adaptations. :grinning:
The original version requires you to hold the power button while the ESP performs its negotiations. That makes it substantially less than practical. The obvious (to me at least) improvement which someone tested for me some years ago is to use the button to pull CH_PD high and hold it high with a diode from a GPIO pin until the handshake is complete. Much more sensible than switching the power supply.

I was trying to find the circuit from my previous posts. Now that you have reminded me that the “button” did not actually use an ESP-01, with some diligence I have found my previous post with the circuit: :sunglasses:

Terrific. Thank you!

.