Flashing Fusebit Doctor .hex & .bin files

As a measure to try to revive a Atmega328 I have, I built myself a Fusebit Doctor. The hardware is complete.

All I need now is to flash an Atmega328 (non-P) with the firmware for the board.

I understand I have to 1st) flash the fuses to the ones recommended by the developer:

FUSEBITS: internal 1MHz clock, EESAVE enabled: M328 L:0x62 H:0xD1 E:0xFF

2) Flash the HEX file (that I can do!)

3) Flash a BIN file

Here are the questions (consider I'll be using a USBasp, and I'll edit the avrdude.conf for the proper signature of my Atmega328 non-P):

Q1) the Atmega328 I'll be using as the "rescuer" chip already has the Arduino bootloader (Uno) flashed to it, and is already configured to use the external 16MHz crystal. When I am to flash the new fuses to this chip, should I have it in an arduino board with the crystal or in a breadboard without any crystal?

Q2) How do I flash the BIN file? (I know how to flash the HEX file).

Any help, anyone?

I really need help on how to flash the BIN file from Fusebit Doctor.

Thanks in advance.

Sorry for insisting so much in this, but how do I save the BIN (EEPROM) file to the ATMEGA8 ?

.bin files are programmed to EEPROM with avrdude the same way (almost) that .hex files are programmed to the flash. Avrdude should auto-detect the .bin format, so:

 a[color=brown]vrdude -patmega328p -carduino -P /dev/tty.usbmodemfd3141  -U eeprom:w:/Downloads/atmega_fusebit_doctor_2.11_m328p.bin[/color]

avrdude: AVR device initialized and ready to accept instructions

Reading | ################################################## | 100% 0.00s

avrdude: Device signature = 0x1e950f
avrdude: reading input file "/Downloads/atmega_fusebit_doctor_2.11_m328p.bin"
avrdude: input file /Downloads/atmega_fusebit_doctor_2.11_m328p.bin auto detected as raw binary
avrdude: writing eeprom (1024 bytes):

Thank you! IT woked like a charm.

Just one last question:

Do I need to set any lockbits in the ATMEGA8 after setting the fuses and flashing the HEX and BIN file?

No. For a well-behaved program, the lockbits should be irrelevant.