Good practices?

I have (I think) burnt out two Arduino Uno boards so far, and have not yet successfully programmed any Atmega328p chips by any means other than placing them in an Arduino Uno board and programming them through its built in USB to Serial interface.

I live in an apartment with carpet, but I try to handle electronics carefully. How exactly would one ground themselves so as not to impart a static shock into electronics?

Also, what are some good rules to follow? I'm asking because all my electronics boards seem to fail as I use them :frowning:

Do you have a wrist strap? Antistatic device - Wikipedia

m34tcode:
I live in an apartment with carpet, but I try to handle electronics carefully. How exactly would one ground themselves so as not to impart a static shock into electronics?

Take your shoes and socks off!

I suspect that if you really have a lot of trouble frying electronics it is probably not static but other mistakes. Especially if you do not often note hurtful sparks.

Don't wear nylon or other synthetics when handling electronics!

The black conducive foam for carrying chips around is invaluable, it protects the
pins from bending and protects from static. When you pick up the foam you bring it
to your body potential before you touch the chips themselves.

Conducive worktops are useful (plain old wood works), but never work on metal
benches, too much risk of shorting things when testing stuff IMO.

The risk of static goes up as relative humidity goes down, which is why cold
winter weather can be the worst for static - dry cold air gets heated in buildings
making its relative humidy very low.

m34tcode:
I live in an apartment with carpet, but I try to handle electronics carefully. How exactly would one ground themselves so as not to impart a static shock into electronics?

Also, what are some good rules to follow? I'm asking because all my electronics boards seem to fail as I use them :frowning:

Arduinos have lots of metal bits, eg. the big socket where the USB plug goes. Touching that will get rid of any static charge (do you get sparks when you touch it?)

OTOH it seems doubtful that static electricity is the problem. Arduinos aren't very sensitive to it.

If you're really paranoid you can get an anti-static mat to work on (wrist straps are a pain in the ass and you end up not using them, mats are always there...)

MarkT:
Don't wear nylon or other synthetics when handling electronics!

It's more often the chair that's at fault (in my experience).

Plastic wheels on nylon carpet = guaranteed sparks.

fungus:

MarkT:
Don't wear nylon or other synthetics when handling electronics!

It's more often the chair that's at fault (in my experience).

Plastic wheels on nylon carpet = guaranteed sparks.

True, chairs can be bad, I'll include the chair as part of the clothing - wooden chair
preferred (they do make anti-static chairs I believe).