Helmet Shock And Sound Detection?

I'm looking to create a device which detects levels of shock and sound from impacts felt inside various helmets and relay that information to my PC.

The purpose is to determine what forces the brain would undergo and how loud it is in the helmet when struck from various swords, maces, war hammers etc.

I'd like to try to keep the project as cheap and simple as possible for now. I've just got the Uno board, I'm working by myself and this is just a pet project.

The sensors will likely be housed inside a mannequin head modified to be the same weight as a human head though I might make use ballistic gel and bone analogues at a later date. The Arduino will be housed separately to avoid damage and connected with long wires.

Sound sensor should be able to detect >130 decibel. Possibly one sensor for each ear.

G-force detection should go up to about 100g and ideally be 3 axis though total g-force would be good enough.

I don't need to do anything too complicated with the data. I'd imagine easiest way would be to record the data read by the sensors in to the Uno's ram when a button is pressed and then feed that data to my PC via serial and clear the ram after a set period of time. From there it should be simple enough to copy the data in to excel (unless there's an easy way to process it in to a CSV automatically).

Alternatively I could just stream the data live so I don't have to worry about the 2KB limit.

I've done the tutorial projects but that's about it so I'm still a novice at Arduino programming (though I do have experience with Unity and basic so I'm not completely clueless at programming).

What sensors would everyone recommend?

What's the best approach for recording and streaming the data?

Is there a simply way to process the data in to either a CSV or excel document?

The ADXL337 can measure 200g shocks in 3D.

Of course, at over about 100g the [u]brain[/u] of the person wearing the helmet is being damaged. Have fun while you can still enjoy it!

jremington: The ADXL337 can measure 200g shocks in 3D.

Of course, at over about 100g the [u]brain[/u] of the person wearing the helmet is being damaged. Have fun while you can still enjoy it!

Seems perfect, I'd like to have spent a bit less money than that though.

Oops, removed my post. (I had the ADXL335, not ADXL377. :( )