How to control DC motor with optical encoder from HP printer

Hi I’m new in this forum! I’ve found a DC motor with an optical encoder from my old HP printer (attached images below). I want to use this system to move linearly a gear rack, so I want to control the motor in both rotation directions (clockwise and counterclockwise). Is it possible to control the DC motor with optical encoder with Arduino for this purpose? How can I do it?

Thanks!

Yes you can.
1st step - figure out what kind of motor it is. I can't read the marking on the side.

I took a printer to pieces recently and the encoder was very much finer (more steps) than the one in your picture.

My assumption is that there is some very clever / complex software in printers to save the cost of a stepper motor.
Also I suspect that the printers use the encoder to know where the print head is located while it is moving but NOT to stop it at a specific place (apart from the ends of the platform).

…R

The first step will be reading the encoder. It looks like an optical device. It looks like it only has three wires (assuming white and black are the motor brushes). That would mean a single optical sensor: Ground, LED, Sensor and not a quadrature sensor. That means you won't be able to get direction information from it. You might be able to substitute the quadrature sensor from an ancient optical mouse.

Hi,

http://www.kysanelectronics.com/graphics/RK-370CA.pdf

Can't find anything about the opto chopper on the back.

Tom...... :slight_smile:

johnwasser:
That means you won't be able to get direction information from it.

My guess is that HP sized and powered the motor so they could be sure if they gave power for clockwise motion it would be going clockwise - etc.

...R

Robin2:
My guess is that HP sized and powered the motor so they could be sure if they gave power for clockwise motion it would be going clockwise - etc.

Or it is possible that it is in part of the printer that doesn’t need bidirectional control. Maybe like the paper feed or the photoconductor band on a laser printer.