"Kitchen Timer" with Potentiometer

Hi All,

I would like to request some help building a kitchen timer using the LCD 1602 and either an Arduino Nano or Uno (Have both), but would like to set the hours and mins on the timer using a potentiometer, and then have a button to confirm the time once selected with the potentiometer.

A would connect a buzzer to sound when the timer reaches 0. I have looked at some tutorials, as I am still new to Arduino and have done some smaller projects, but cannot find one that uses a potentiometer as I intend.

Any advice / links to tutorials would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

Have you thought of using map() ?

An I2C backpack for the 1602 reduces the effort to connect it all up.

A potentiometer (say 270 degree sweep - linear) would probably give a maximum granularity of 120 minutes and it then becomes difficult to select an exact minute.

If you want further precision, you'll probably have to use a (the) button to switch between "set hours" mode and "set minutes" mode in order to set hours and minutes separately.

If you look at ovens, clocks etc. they tend to use buttons to set the time rather than dials (unless they are using electro-mechanical timers).

If you really want a dial have you thought about using a rotary encoder rather than a potentiometer it might be a better solution for what you are trying to do.

OK... An old fashioned mechanical timer is nice because it's easy to set and easy to re-adjust... In the kitchen I prefer it to pushing buttons.

The problem with a pot is, it doesn't move automatically as the time counts down. So for example, if you've got the pot set to the maximum, or nearly the maximum, you can't add time.

A rotary encoder doesn't move automatically either but it rotates more than 360-degrees so you can always increase or decrease the time while it's running. (My friend had an oven with a small rotary encoder to set the temperature and it was super handy.) With a rotary encoder you can also add some intelligence or "acceleration" so that fast-rotation makes big changes and slow-rotation makes small changes.

Surely the old fashioned mechanical device is the almost perfect solution for the job?

Indicates time left clearly , resettable or extendable on the fly , no batteries required.

And accurate enough.

Allan

Thanks guys.

Will have a look at your suggestions!