Learn a little about the 74HC595 shift register and MUCH more...

Here’s the gig…

Thank you for your time, and THIS FILE REALLY HAS A LOT OF INFORMATION FOR BEGINNERS.
Learn why hexadecimal numbers ROCK! Hex numbers are worth more than you think.

I’ve discovered Arduino in early January of 2020, and I’ve been teaching myself all about it.

I purchased an Arduino kit, and started at the basics, with turning three LEDs on and off. One thing led to another, and I discovered the 74HC595 shift register, which turns 8 LED lights on and off.

I’ve learned a TON of information, and I thought I might share some of my knowledge with other beginners, BUT, I would appreciate it if anyone out there that is really up on Arduino might look through this code to confirm my statements on the 74HC595 that I placed in the //comments of the loop().

Again, thank you to the Arduino community!

https://create.arduino.cc/editor/ItsCaseyDambit/cae53bad-be8b-41ba-95b3-1d798d0553b4/preview

The guide looks pretty good - hard to tell yet.

OP, can you please post your tutorial correctly with “QUOTES” and </> CODE tags.
You can edit your first post when you’ve fixed the content.
Or ask a mod to delete it if you want to re-post

As it is, we have to go offsite, read, copy and come back to the forum.
You’re only new here so this can be forgiven.

In the future, I doubt anyone will actually read your offsite guides.

Wow.

I guess I just shouldn’t care about sharing my knowledge.

I guess I should know what OP means, but I don’t.

“OP, can you please post your tutorial correctly with “QUOTES” and </> CODE tags?”

Half of what you’re saying is beyond my feeble mind.

In the future, I doubt anyone beside me will actually care about any of this, but HEY!

THANKS FOR THE HELP!

Raspberry PI looks interesting.

Take care.

You may also wish to check your understanding of array bounds and for loops.

RaspberryPi is even more picky about accessing memory you don’t own.

Please don't take umbrage, your efforts are appreciated and you have obviously put a lot of work into the guide

OP = Original Poster

The suggestion is that you post the guide here to make it easy to access
It is too large to post here directly so please attach it to a post. Perhaps post the actual code here in code tags and attach the tutorial section as a .txt file

Thanks for taking the time to share your knowledge @ItsCaseyDambit. We tend to have more strict requirements for the topics in the “Introductory Tutorials” board than in the other forum boards. I do think your tutorial would be much more useful if you posted it directly here on the forum. I find it less enjoyable to read that much text as a comment in a sketch.

ItsCaseyDambit:
I guess I should know what OP means, but I don’t.

“OP, can you please post your tutorial correctly with “QUOTES” and </> CODE tags?”

Half of what you’re saying is beyond my feeble mind.

@lastchancename is talking about the forum markup. You can use the button on the post toolbar that looks like a speech bubble to insert quote tags. If the toolbar isn’t shown in your browser (I think it doesn’t on the mobile version of the forum), you can just write the markup tags yourself:

[quote]

[color=blue]quoted text here[/color]

[/quote]

That is rendered like this:

quoted text here

I’m actually not sure whether there is anything in your tutorial that would require quote tags, but it is a useful thing to know about.

There certainly is need for code tags on the code in the tutorial. You can use the button on the post toolbar that looks like a speech bubble to insert quote tags. If the toolbar isn’t shown in your browser (I think it doesn’t on the mobile version of the forum), you can just write the markup tags yourself:
[code]``[color=blue]// your code is here[/color]``[/code]
That renders as:

// your code is here

The reason code tags are important is that, without code tags, the forum software can interpret parts of your code as markup, and mess up the program. For example, if you post this code:

for (byte i = 0; i < 42; i++) {
  readings[i] = digitalRead(8);
  delay(10);
}

without code tags, it is rendered like this on the forum:

for (byte i = 0; i < 42; i++) {
readings = digitalRead(8);

  • delay(10);*
    }

Notice the italics and the smiley face, that’s no good!

Code tags also make it easier to read code (because it doesn’t wrap lines) and to copy it to our IDE.

@ItsCaseyDambit

There was certainly no offence intended, as @PERT pointed out, this particular section is a bit stricter, because we assume hope beginners come here to learn fundamentals, so we should demonstrate them in our posts.

As I commented, your 74595 guide was quite comprehensive and well thought out, and generally well formatted - perhaps gaining some ideas from above, but as a newcomer yourself, you may get something from the HOW TO USE THE FORUM AND ALSO HERE links at the top of each section.

The separation of commentary, quotes and code is critical to help get structural and programming ideas across clearly.
The same applies for any images you may want to attach or insert in-line.

(Edit... ironic. Fixed the inline hyperlinks !)

Your interest in helping others with fundamentals is valuable to the group.
If you think something shoud be done differently, Use Ask The Mods section, or maybe create a thread looking for suggestions about your ideas.

It's never personal unless a member takes it that way, and it doesn't last long. :slight_smile:

Even CREATE has the ability to add tabs with pictures and seperate sections if you want to keep it on CREATE.

See this as an example << Notice this is a LINK and preferable that is how you should present them rather than as plain text.

Thank you kindly for the guidance.

Being a newbie can stink at times. LOL we've all been there.

Thanks again.