MAG lock problem

So I have use a setup of an arduino nano, 5V relay moduel, and 12v mag lock more times than I can remember. (I build props for escape rooms). We just got a new shipment of mag locks and for some reason that I can not figure out, once the input pin is triggered and the mag lock is to power off, it is cycling the power to the arduino. This seems like to me some issue with the coil in the lock giving off some sort of blowback or something. I have the proper diodes in place and have checked everything twice. any advice would be helpful. This circuit has worked always in the past, we even have PCB boards made for it. now all of a sudden, new mag locks, it no longer works.

  • arduino and lock both being powered by a single 12V 2amp power supply
  • 5v relay module is being triggered by arduino
  • arduino is being powered through 5V regulator

You've concluded on your own that it's because of new mag locks. What is the point of this thread?

The point would be to see if anyone else has any insight or sees something I am missing that would be helpful. If you don't have anything to add then whats the point in responding to it?

The point was to point out how pointless the thread is since you declared the culprit as if we trust your double checking to be conclusive. You also probably expect us to know about your mag locks somehow.
Really, describe what kind of responses you're hoping for. "Yep, those new mag locks are the problem"?

My double checking is not conclusive that was the point in asking. Does telling you that its a 12V 500mA mag lock help you at all or do you still have nothing to add?

Due to your attitude, I have nothing to add.

Attitude? I came on here just looking for suggestions and maybe some help and you thought it fun to tell my my post was pointless. You never had anything to add from the start. You are just some forum troll that feels this need to be a prick to people through a keyboard.

Neat. Another wrong conclusion from you.

Does the ne mag lock has the same specs as the old one ?

Are capable of collecting any data ? ( measurements)

Do you have any test equipment at your disposal ?

Have you put a DMM or scope on the power ?
Does the arduino run off the mag lock 12V ? (bad idea)

If you want some answers you need to provide more info.

Aside from checking your wiring, are you capable of doing anything else ?

At this point my best recommendation is, if you have an old Mag lock, put it on the bench and see what kind of current it takes at a standard voltage. Compare that to the new Mag lock. You may have mistakenly been sent locks rated for a lower voltage, Which may pull too much current from the power supply.

At this point my best recommendation is, if you have an old Mag lock, put it on the bench and see what kind of current it takes at a standard voltage. Compare that to the new Mag lock. You may have mistakenly been sent locks rated for a lower voltage, Which may pull too much current from the power supply.

Yes, I was leading up to that, but think about it. If the OP was capable of that (had the resources and experience), would he not have done that already ? Is that not what anyone with any experience and the necessary equipment would have done ? (this is a no brainer for a technician or engineer but is often not
even in the realm of possibility for a non-technical person.)

Basically-
OP: "I have a working circuit. When I change this one component, it stops working. I think the problem is the changed component. I want someone to tell me the problem is elsewhere because you're not allowed to agree with me."

raschemmel:
Yes, I was leading up to that, but think about it. If the OP was capable of that (had the resources and experience), would he not have done that already ? Is that not what anyone with any experience and the necessary equipment would have done ? (this is a no brainer for a technician or engineer but is often not
even in the realm of possibility for a non-technical person.)

oddly enough, you say that as if anyone with experience, Would think of something simple like that. My experience with engineers tells me otherwise. Many years ago, I was installing Automotive air-conditioning . The manufacturer had just gone over to electronic thermostats. the first batch we got work perfectly. But the second batch we got, Cycled at 55° F. After diagnosing the problem, I determined that it was a thermostat or the sensor was bad. I replaced both with the same results. Call the manufacturer and talk to an engineer. I explained the problem. You could tell how frantic he was by the tone of his voice. he said it had already been reported and they had determined they needed to redesign the thermostat. He also said there was nothing I could do. I would just have to wait, and it would be a month before the new thermostats would be available. Unfortunately this was the peak air-conditioning season, So I suggested putting a resistor in line with the potentiometer/sensor. The phone got deathly quiet, after a few seconds I asked, Will that work. he said yes yes. I said then you will authorize it, he said yes yes do it. I know for fact that he turned to his colleagues and said something to the effect, I have the answer. Because the next batch of air-conditioning systems we got all had that resistor installed. You would think that a highly educated team of electronic engineers would think of something as simple as a resistor to fix a major problem. But history has told me otherwise. And this is not the only instance where this has happened.

Oddly enough, I believe you.