Need someone to code for peristaltic pumps

Hi! I'm in need for someone who can code an arduino to control two peristaltic pumps with stepper motors to fill each a container. I would need it to fill a container with 250ml of a fluid and the other pump to fill a container with 500ml. So a basic switch on fill and stop.

I would be willing to compensate with money.

Thanks!

Spinning a stepper motor, with the right hardware, is trivial. Getting n steps to make a pump dispense m milliliters of fluid is not.

How are you going to measure the amount of liquid actually dispensed?

Well I would need it to dispense 250ml of a solution at a time. Let say press one button and pass 250ml from one recipient to another recipient. The next pump would be another button that would dispense 500ml from one recipient to another as well. What I am not sure is if this should be something that is calibrated at the pump meaning at x rate run y amount of time, or I am not sure if the flow meter from adafruit can be made to work with the arduino and use that as a more precise of measuring the amount.

I am open to suggestions.

jpmc:
Send me a PM if you’d like some help in getting this done. I have literally years of experience controlling peristaltic pumps in medical instruments. I would not suggest using the flowmeter in this application since the peri pumps produce a somewhat pulsating flow and the paddle type flowmeter works best with a constant flow rate.

A lot depends on the accuracy you need. Peri pumps are good where you need to dispense a preset amount of liquid, but they do not have the accuracy of syringe pumps that can precisely dispense a few microliters of fluid. The peri pump accuracy is dependent on a number of factors such as the correct type of tubing and its age (must be replaced at regular intervals), setting the correct roller tension on pumps that are adjustable. The accuracy of the stepper motor driving it is only a single factor.

To calibrate pumps we have generally used a gravimetric method: i.e., dispense an expected volume and then weigh the volume to compare to what’s expected, then use a calibration factor. You can do the same thing with a graduated measuring cylinder.

Send me a PM and we can talk, this is not a difficult task and I’d be happy to help.

PaulS:
Spinning a stepper motor, with the right hardware, is trivial. Getting n steps to make a pump dispense m milliliters of fluid is not.

How are you going to measure the amount of liquid actually dispensed?

The density of the fluid is usually constant. Not much of a variable there which I understand would have been another issue. I plan on just measuring with a graduated measuring cylinder at x speed of the pump it takes y amount of time to get the measurement I need. I understand this might not be the most precise way of doing it, but I think it will be close enough for what I need.

cedarlakeinstruments:
jpmc:
Send me a PM if you'd like some help in getting this done. I have literally years of experience controlling peristaltic pumps in medical instruments. I would not suggest using the flowmeter in this application since the peri pumps produce a somewhat pulsating flow and the paddle type flowmeter works best with a constant flow rate.

A lot depends on the accuracy you need. Peri pumps are good where you need to dispense a preset amount of liquid, but they do not have the accuracy of syringe pumps that can precisely dispense a few microliters of fluid. The peri pump accuracy is dependent on a number of factors such as the correct type of tubing and its age (must be replaced at regular intervals), setting the correct roller tension on pumps that are adjustable. The accuracy of the stepper motor driving it is only a single factor.

To calibrate pumps we have generally used a gravimetric method: i.e., dispense an expected volume and then weigh the volume to compare to what's expected, then use a calibration factor. You can do the same thing with a graduated measuring cylinder.

Send me a PM and we can talk, this is not a difficult task and I'd be happy to help.

PM sent!