New Arduino intel processor board

What do you think of the Galileo? At the Rome maker fair they were giving them away. It was a bit sinister, rather like an episode of Dr. Who.Once you opened the box you got that intel tinkel sound from a module underneath. I coudn't shut the bloody thing up so I had to wrap it in tape. Going corporate? Selling out? Or the best thing since sliced bread?

Your chips now come with built-in emotions, and want to be friends with you. Embrace the future. Resistance is futile. All your base are belong to them.

oric_dan:
Your chips now come with built-in emotions, and want to be friends with you. Embrace the future. Resistance is futile. All your base are belong to them.

It does seem like that. I said to one of the Irish designers that it was a bit like supping with the devil and he did not “get” what I was saying.
Anyway back in my hotel room here is a photo of it. Complete with 3A power supply and soft fluffy space man.

Just went to download the software, and despite the CEO of Intel saying they embraced open source there are a whole stack of conditions. Put in a code box for scrolability

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So either these conditions are wrong or the CEO of Intel is being economical with the verisimilitude.

It's an interesting looking board. High-speed and lots of RAM. Supposedly Arduino compatible. What do you know about the dev tools? Says Intel will give away 50,000 boards to try and corner the market, what else. http://www.anandtech.com/show/7387/intel-announces-galileo-quark-based-arduino-compatible-developer-board

Was it the little guy in the diver suit that was talking to you? Is he animated?

Grumpy_Mike: Just went to download the software, and despite the CEO of Intel saying they embraced open source there are a whole stack of conditions. ........ So either these conditions are wrong or the CEO of Intel is being economical with the verisimilitude.

I believe M$ does the same thing with their "free" tools, like VC# compiler, etc. Probably also Microchip with MPLAB.

Just click ok, unless .... they also want your name, address, age, phone number, social-security number, bank account info, and high-school grades, which is what Google seems to want with Google Play. [of course, Google already knows all that, in any case, so it's really just a matter of submission and idolatry - am glad you put this in Bar Sport, lol].

ALSO: if you're still in Rome, try to see the Pantheon. I assume you did not miss out on the ancient Forum. It totally rocks.

try to see the Pantheon.

Saw it, it was

Well so much for the Galileo straight out of the box, what ever you try and compile you get:-

Arduino: 1.5.3 (Mac OS X), Board: "Intel® Galileo"

i586-poky-linux-uclibc-g++: error: Galileo/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/hardware/tools/x86/i586-poky-linux-uclibc: No such file or directory

Seems to be looking for 586 compiler tools.

Pantheon - amazing for something designed and built around 100 A.D. - unreinforced concrete dome.

Any word on price yet? I was disappointed with Intel's $250 Raspberry Pi "competitor".

For me, there are two non-starters that make the Galileo uninteresting. 1) The gpio pins are done via an i2c controller, which means you can only achieve 230 Hz throughput on the pins, and you can't do things like ws2812 lights (Adafruit's neopixels) which needs a fixed 800 Khz datastream. 2) It needs 5 volts and 3 amps to power it, and you can't use the USB to power it.

For other people, I can imagine that it not being to be an i2c or spi space means you may have tor rewrite setups that used multiple boards to communicate.

I missed the part about GPIO via I2C. That's a definite downside. Also, 3A current would be miserable. Definitely, interest killers.

1) The gpio pins are done via an i2c controller, which means you can only achieve 230 Hz throughput on the pins, and you can't do things like ws2812 lights (Adafruit's neopixels) which needs a fixed 800 Khz datastream.

There are apparently two raw pins that can be configured for rapid I/O and achieve in the MHz range of I/O. The only thing is taht it is a high impedance output so it would need buffering. I mentioned the disappointing speed on the Intel stand, and they said they were surprised themselves at the I2C speed, apparently it is not made very clear in the data sheet that it can only do low speed stuff. That they say will be fixed on the next board. I don't think the pricing will be fixed until the end of the month.

Definitely overkill for making a few LEDs blink or controlling a few motors.

I found this "Arduino" announcement, so apparently something official, http://makezine.com/2013/10/03/arduino-announces-two-new-linux-boards/ Also, official silkscreening, http://makezine.com/2013/10/03/talking-to-jason-kridner-about-the-new-arduino-tre/ http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardTre

Grumpy_Mike: I mentioned the disappointing speed on the Intel stand, and they said they were surprised themselves at the I2C speed, apparently it is not made very clear in the data sheet that it can only do low speed stuff. That they say will be fixed on the next board.

Unfortunately you only get one chance to make a good first impression. Even if they eventually fix it to have direct I/O, a lot of people will remember it, and not even consider it in the future.

In terms of the datasheet, it is in there, but you have to read the whole thing (on the page on Arduino.cc, it is in the section labeled: Properties of Pins Configured as OUTPUT).

Grumpy_Mike: Well so much for the Galileo straight out of the box, what ever you try and compile you get:-

Arduino: 1.5.3 (Mac OS X), Board: "Intel® Galileo"

i586-poky-linux-uclibc-g++: error: Galileo/Arduino.app/Contents/Resources/Java/hardware/tools/x86/i586-poky-linux-uclibc: No such file or directory

was the arduino app renamed when you installed? there is an issue if there a " " anywhere in the path as well as the app name. if thats the case, changing the " " to "_" or something else fixes the issue

Based on some of these posts, it seems a little half-a$$ed to me. Which isn't altogether surprising. How much of Intel's attention is this really getting?

What software is it that's subject to the license? I know many companies throw an overly-restrictive license on just to CYA, but that really makes it undesirable for individuals, groups, organizations, and start-ups to vet the license and ensure they're not breaking any of the terms. I like knowing I can design a widget, slap it together with an Uno, and sell it if I want. Or give it away. Or whatever.

The speed of the pins is a deal-breaker. I can use something like the BeagleBone to bit-bang a lot of protocols at high speed, assuming that whatever I need isn't directly implemented by the CPU. I realize high-speed circuits come with their own challenges and there may be limits imposed just by the nature of pin headers and breakout boards, but still... give the ability to push that envelope as much as you can!

I suppose this will be useful for highly processor-intensive tasks with few GPIO requirements. They're a little late to that party, although at least having an x86 platform opens the door to closed-source binaries that aren't available on ARM.

SirNickity: I suppose this will be useful for highly processor-intensive tasks with few GPIO requirements. They're a little late to that party, although at least having an x86 platform opens the door to closed-source binaries that aren't available on ARM.

The other sticking point for me is the requirement for 5 volt, 3 amp power, and not being able to be powered by USB or li-poly batteries.

In terms of closed-source binaries, given it doesn't run Windows, how many closed source Linux apps are there out there? I supose you could run Wine to run the Windows binaries.

I just can't see what sort of projects I could use this in. A 58 second boot time to the previous sketch and painfully slow I/O. But lots of memory. I supposed if some one had a video driver to the USB port it would help, but otherwise what?

@cage Thanks for the comments, I did find tat out on my first night with it and did report it here but in an other thread in installation and troubleshooting.

What software is it that's subject to the license?

It is the Arduino IDE that is full of restrictions saying you must not disassemble it which is stupid given that they said the source code was going to be available. I think it is just big corporation non thinking that keeps the restrictions on, but you have to click to say you agree before you can down load it.