O'scope or Logic Analyzer

Very new to the world of electronics and Arduino,
As a first project, I'm needing to hack some DRO scales, specifically the iGaging Absolute series Dial Depth Gauge 0-22inch for use with Yuriy's Toys Touch DRO system DIY DRO Project | Yuriy's Toys.
The Absolute series scales currently do not work with the Touch DRO system and it doesn't seem an answer is forthcoming soon.
I did find a little info why they won't work.

"At a minimum, the Absolute DRO has a 2KHz clock. But, changing the clock freq isn't enough.
The data line is severely attenuated with a 5.6K PD resistor. The original display unit has a 100K PU resistor, so this will require a schematic change to match.
Have not had a chance to look at the data on the logic analyzer to confirm if it is still 21-bit.
(There also appears to be a pull up on pin 4 of the Mini-USB. Looks to be a basic connection check - the control unit stops sending the clock if that pull up is removed. Looks like this can be ignored.)"

Any suggestions if I'd be better served (in the long run) getting something like the Rigol DS1102D O'scope for this or just go with something like the Rigol Logic 8 logic analyzer ?
Is there a cheaper way to go for doing this ?

That Rigol 'scope is a nice instrument but is probably overkill for your project. You could probably do all you need with a Bitscope. Of course, if you are going to progress to more involved projects then . . . .

Russell.

Budget?

I am very happy with Saleae HERE

There are counterfeits out there but I support the original developer.

.

ikn2:
Any suggestions if I'd be better served (in the long run) getting something like the Rigol DS1102D O'scope for this or just go with something like the Rigol Logic 8 logic analyzer ?

In a long run an oscilloscope is better than a logic analyser. Just because oscilloscope as a generic tool, while logic analyser is a rarely needed specific tool.

I have bad experience with PC-based oscilloscopes. Many of them are not real oscilloscopes but rather dodgy data acquisition devices with nice looking and bad working software. Instead of processing data on-board they send acquired data to PC via USB. Limited USB bandwidth creates a bottleneck, as a result those pseudo-oscilloscopes miss a lot of data. That makes them useless.

Stand-alone oscilloscopes are much better. Rigol is a bit expensive, while it has very narrow screen and annoying menus (I have DS1062C). You might find cheaper Chineese oscilloscope with wider screen, such as Atten ADS1062.

Yes a scope every time. It will show the situations where you have a poor rise time on a signal or an insufficient voltage which are most of the errors you will get when trying to fault find. A logic analyser is mainly for debugging bus conflicts which you do not have in a single all in one embedded processor.

I third (fourth) the oscilloscope. A logic analyzer is only needed if you need to look at a lot of digital signals at once.

To use a DSO, you have to understand sample frequency
and how that is effected by the sweep range used.
I prefer a true analog scope for anything under 100MHz.
It should have at least 2 channels with separate trigger
and delayed sweep.
With that, you'll find it rare that you'd need a DSO or a logic
analyzer.
Dwight

To use a DSO, you have to understand sample frequency
and how that is effected by the sweep range used.

I would disagree, most students can use a digital scope without knowing that.

With that, you'll find it rare that you'd need a DSO or a logic

Unless you want to look at pre trigger stuff.

akouz:
You might find cheaper Chineese oscilloscope with wider screen, such as Atten ADS1062.

For pretty much the same price you can get a 4 channel Rigol 1054Z.
The best $400 I've spent recently.

I found a Tectronix 2215 on Craig's List and got it for $20. Works with Arduino stuff really well. PC or other high frequency stuff, not so much. But hey - it was twenty bucks!

dwightthinker:
I prefer a true analog scope for anything under 100MHz.

Me too, although that is probably a result of familiarity from years of use.

I designed and built my first oscilloscope in the early 1960s while still at school. I had been given a government surplus VCR97 radar display tube and I scrounged a number of EF50 valves (tubes) from scrap televisions. It worked well enough for audio experimenting.

Russell.

How about getting an MSO with built in logic analyser like the Rigol MSO1000 series? What do you think? Worth the extra money?

Grumpy_Mike:
I would disagree, most students can use a digital scope without knowing that.

I helped wit an electronics class once. I'd say 50% of the students had troubles
recognizing sampling frequency errors.

Unless you want to look at pre trigger stuff.

I have all three types of scopes. I use the analog mostly, the
digital some times and almost never use the logic analyzer.
It is nice to get pre-trigger stuff, especially when working on a
uP circuit to see what happened to get there. Nice but not
essential.
Dwight

I think OP is MIA

The big thing about a digital storage scope over an analogue one, is that you can capture and anylise one off events and use the memory depth to look at a number of pulses either side of the trigger event. This allows you to spot things you can not see with an analogue scope.
An analogue scope however is very good when there is a mixture of widely differing frequencies in a signal.

The Rigol scope I have allows you to anylise I2C and serial data and gives the byte data in hex over the trace and this is also useful, something that you might have used a logic anyliser for years ago.

The Rigol scope I have allows you to anylise I2C ....

May I ask which model it is ?

It is the DS1074Z-S
DS1074Z-S
It is on special offer here I paid over twice that last year. :o There must be a new model out.

Thats the one i am considering to buy (without the built in function generator) . I2C bus decoding is an extra though.... I am also thinning of getting the 100Mhz version..

I2C bus decoding is an extra though.

It is free for the first 30 hours you use the scope. After that there are ways.

am also thinning of getting the 100Mhz version..

There is no physical difference between the two, it is just a software upgrade. Again there are ways.

there are ways

May be these..ways have been disabled in the latest releases though! I Dont know :slight_smile: