Panel mount connector

I’m trying to build a rgb led strip controller. I want you to be able to plug the strip into a panel mount connector on the side of the box. The strip has 3 wires ending in a JST SM connector and 2 other bare wires. I couldn’t find a panel mount JST SM connector, and since I would have two additional wires, could I use something like this?

I purchased the same connector but in 4 pin. I have not used mine yet but they seem pretty decent so should work.

The only issue is, in an ideal world the pins should be on the cable end not the panel end. This is so a errant screwdriver doesn't short out the exposed pins with voltage on them.

JohnRob:
I purchased the same connector but in 4 pin. I have not used mine yet but they seem pretty decent so should work.

The only issue is, in an ideal world the pins should be on the cable end not the panel end. This is so a errant screwdriver doesn’t short out the exposed pins with voltage on them.

So maybe this and this would be better?

DIN plugs are great for audio work and MIDI applications. They are also good for other light-duty application, but are kind of wimpy when it comes to heavier applications. The DIY plugs also tend to come apart, If you're not careful. And you still have the same problem, but on the opposite end of the cable.

In my opinion, the aviation XLR plug is a better choice. It can take a higher current, and is little more heavy-duty. It is also a lot easier to put together, not so many parts.

To solve the potential screwdriver shorting it out problem, Use a 4 pin connector. Use the fourth pin as a sensor. This pin should be connected to a relay or a P-channel MOS FET. When the cable is plugged in on both ends, this pin is connected to ground turning the power on. If both ends of the cable is not plugged in, there is no power going to the plug. This pin can also tell the processor that the cable is not properly connected, and change the data pin to high impedance.

promacjoe2:
DIN plugs are great for audio work and MIDI applications. They are also good for other light-duty application, but are kind of wimpy when it comes to heavier applications. The DIY plugs also tend to come apart, If you're not careful. And you still have the same problem, but on the opposite end of the cable.

In my opinion, the aviation XLR plug is a better choice. It can take a higher current, and is little more heavy-duty. It is also a lot easier to put together, not so many parts.

To solve the potential screwdriver shorting it out problem, Use a 4 pin connector. Use the fourth pin as a sensor. This pin should be connected to a relay or a P-channel MOS FET. When the cable is plugged in on both ends, this pin is connected to ground turning the power on. If both ends of the cable is not plugged in, there is no power going to the plug. This pin can also tell the processor that the cable is not properly connected, and change the data pin to high impedance.

You mean 6 pin, 5 for the rgb strip and 1 for the sensor?

that would depend on how he was doing his power. He showed a three pin plug, so I just added one pin to his plug. I was thinking he was making a one wire serial RGB LED Controller.