Physical connection issues

So I have my first project all ready to deploy... Or at least I thought I did. I have the code working the way I want it, the relay is controlling the fan properly. Basically everything is golden. Right up to the point that I try and take it off the breadboard and make it permanent. I just can't figure out a good way to connect everything up the way I need it.

Specifically I am using two https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07T7ZR7MS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 as remote sensors that need to be about 5 feet from the Arduino. I tried soldering the wires to the legs, no luck. The joins didn't hold and the wires slid down the legs and shorted each other pretty quickly.

I tried crimp connectors, no luck... How the heck do I reliably connect a piece of wire to these legs so I can install everything?

I feel this shouldn't be that hard, but for some reason I must be missing something easy? I feel like I just need some soldering practice, but is there a better way to do this?

If it were my project, I would de-solder the pins from the board and solder wires. But I gather that your soldering skills are about equal to my brain surgery skills.

My soldering skills only eclipse my welding skills true....

But desoldering the pins and attaching the wires there sounds brilliant. I think I should be able to pull it off.

Thanks for the suggestion.

Hi,
What Arduino controller are you using?
What size soldering iron are you using?

OPs sensor;
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Tom.. :slight_smile:

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TomGeorge:
Hi,
What Arduino controller are you using?
What size soldering iron are you using?

I am using a Nano-Every.

Are you asking about tips or irons? I bought a WEP 927I soldering station. Basically something good enough (I hope) to grow into without being too expensive to justify for a beginner. I then used a small size tip, but I think for doing the pins a larger one would have been better. I just forgot to switch from desoldering some pins from the Nano, and didn’t want to wait for everything to cool down.

I also was trying to solder solid core wire to the legs… after some intense YouTube watching it seems there is a technique to doing this, and it starts with using stranded wire. I have some coming in later today, so I will give it a shot and see how it goes.

rubingr:
But desoldering the pins and attaching the wires there sounds brilliant. I think I should be able to pull it off.

Speaking of "pulling it off", given you do not wish to salvage the pin header, just pull the plastic part off over the pins (cutting them off if necessary) and then de-solder and pull them out of the board individually.

A cheap manual solder sucker is an important tool to clear the PCB holes.

There should be no difficulty soldering to the header pins but a proportion of the "Dupont" cables sold contain useless aluminium wire which cannot be soldered. :cold_sweat:

Paul__B:
Speaking of "pulling it off", given you do not wish to salvage the pin header, just pull the plastic part off over the pins (cutting them off if necessary) and then de-solder and pull them out of the board individually.

A cheap manual solder sucker is an important tool to clear the PCB holes.

There should be no difficulty soldering to the header pins but a proportion of the "Dupont" cables sold contain useless aluminium wire which cannot be soldered. :cold_sweat:

I already pulled the pins off, and a liberal application of flux and some wick cleaned the holes. As soon as the new wire gets in today I will put it all back together and see how it goes. I have thought about getting a solder sucker, so that may be an impulse purchase in the near future.

Its amazing how many little doodad tools and parts getting into small electronics requires you to buy. When I started I priced out the parts and figured I could make these doodad for just a couple of dollars. $100 later in parts and tool and it is finally coming together.

rubingr:
Its amazing how many little doodad tools and parts getting into small electronics requires you to buy. When I started I priced out the parts and figured I could make these doodad for just a couple of dollars. $100 later in parts and tool and it is finally coming together.

Electronics, Ham Radio and Computers have been my hobby for decades. This week, I am cleaning out my basement and workshop. So far, I've discarded a ton of old stuff, and it doesn't look like I've even made a dent.

Sounds painful! :astonished:

My other hobbies are racing sailboats and woodworking... The amount of 'stuff' I store is just ridiculous.

Take this fwiw but so far I have found my 3d printer to be a massive help. Since I started playing with Arduinos I think half of what I have printed has been for Arduino stuff... Custom enclosures, housings, and lots of parts bins... And this is just my first project. I can't imagine what it will look like in a year.

rubingr:
My other hobbies are racing sailboats and woodworking... The amount of 'stuff' I store is just ridiculous.

Take this fwiw but so far I have found my 3d printer to be a massive help. Since I started playing with Arduinos I think half of what I have printed has been for Arduino stuff... Custom enclosures, housings, and lots of parts bins... And this is just my first project. I can't imagine what it will look like in a year.

It’s an infectious disease, keep your distance and wear a mask when soldering.

larryd:
It’s an infectious disease, keep your distance and wear a mask when soldering.

I've been soldering since before you were breathing. Just put a fan nearby to keep the fumes away from your face.

Something has badly affected my lungs since I have never smoked.

I think it's a toss-up between soldering flux and burning human flesh (occupational hazard), Probably substantially more of the latter. :astonished: