Piezoelectric pump

Hello,
I have ordered a Piezoelectric pump from a company that says it can be run via Arduino. The attachment shows how the arduino attaches to the mp6-oem driver board.
This pump operates as follows:

The amplitude defines the stroke of the
actuator and therefore the displacement of
the pumping media per pump cycles.
Increase in amplitude linearly increases the
flow rate to the maximum.

The OEM-controller drives the micropump at adjustable performance in a package
similar to an integrated circuit. It enables integration into system electronics or
on a PCB.

Max. volume flow
(DI-water)
4.9 ml/min @ 3 VDC supply; 100 Hz
7 ml/min @ 5 VDC supply; 100 Hz
Adjustable parameters amplitude, frequency
Amplitude range 85 – 270 Vpp 1
Frequency range
25 - 226 Hz

How do I adjust the amplitude in a sketch so I can use a 2 position toggle to switch between one flow rate and another?

GetAttachment.jpg

better pic

A data sheet of the module is needed for reasonable answers.

In general you need a (RC) low pass filter for the PWM amplitude signal, and a square wave for the clock signal.

Hi,
OPs PIC.
62f5f12920ce8e9598615f9406fe366a3429824d.jpg

Tom… :slight_smile:

DrDiettrich:
A data sheet of the module is needed for reasonable answers.

In general you need a (RC) low pass filter for the PWM amplitude signal, and a square wave for the clock signal.

I thought Vpp implied AC voltage ?

Cashdds:
Hello,
I have ordered a Piezoelectric pump from a company that says it can be run via Arduino. The attachment shows how the arduino attaches to the mp6-oem driver board.
This pump operates as follows:

not sure why no one scolded you for not posting the data sheet for the driver you want to control.

you have a pump, and a driver. you need to interfect with that driver. that is all you care about.
it takes 5 volts power and it should control the pump with all the needed pulses and voltages and such.

you should be sending it a signal, a pulse, an analog, or some thing that tells the driver what to do.

reading the data sheet, it looks like your options are
Signal form : SRS, rectangular, sine

the manufactuere is not clear in connections or where the signals are generated, but I assume ( yes ass-you-me ) that you know how to connect the 270 volts and that you are not sure of the control signals.

I would offer that if you post a link to the data sheet, someone will be able to read it for you can advise what you need to do.

I would expect that the best way is to get the manufactuer to offer that information, as I would suspect they have it in a very neat data sheet.

in reading the data sheet for the driver, it is clear the manufacture is not speaking English and the translation is offing just the tip of the data and expects you to figure out the rest.

good luck ! I hope you get this figured out.

TomGeorge:
Hi,
OPs PIC.
62f5f12920ce8e9598615f9406fe366a3429824d.jpg

Tom… :slight_smile:

you have a low pass filter on the PWM output and use a non-PWM for the clock.
the analog the single for the the amplitude.
the clock is your square wave. how to you set if you want a sine, rectangular or SRS to the the pump ?

How do I adjust the amplitude in a sketch so I can use a 2 position toggle to switch between one flow rate and another?

Why not adjusting the pulse frequency? More easy. Higher frequency gives higher flow.

How would only ever adjust the pulse frequency?.. I need to set it to .5 ml/min and then switch to 1 ml/min....
A potentiometer may be to "rough" of a control (assuming a POT would be a choice, I'm a newbie at tinkering). Simple switch would be preferred...

You can e.g. use tone() for the clock signal, and analogWrite() for the amplitude signal. Lacking a formula for the influence of both on the flow rate, you'll have to figure out useful function parameters yourself.

Hi,

blimpyway:
Why not adjusting the pulse frequency? More easy. Higher frequency gives higher flow.

This is a piezo device and as such is probably tuned to work at a particular frequency, this is why you change amplitude to change flow rate.
A higher or lower frequency will probably mean less efficiency and so less flow.
Tom... :slight_smile:

TomGeorge:
Hi,This is a piezo device and as such is probably tuned to work at a particular frequency, this is why you change amplitude to change flow rate.
A higher or lower frequency will probably mean less efficiency and so less flow.
Tom... :slight_smile:

Ahhhhh....excellent point!!!

Hi,
Then again the spec the OP posted does say;

Frequency range
25 - 226 Hz

So, there must be some amount of control.

Tom.. :slight_smile:

Maybe the frequency can be tuned to the mass of the fluid.
Leo..

Hi,
Yes density would effect the resonant frequency of the pump..
Good thinking 99.

Tom..... :slight_smile:

Wawa:
Maybe the frequency can be tuned to the mass of the fluid.
Leo..

the data sheet does offer tables for air and for DI-water

and a few notes on the values :

CLOCK
Predefined clock signal. Frequency will be set to the nominal 100 Hz, when this pin is
connected to CLOCK_INT (see image “Schematic 1” in chapter 6.6.1).
(The internal capacitor is 2.2 nF.)
A capacitor of 1 to 10 nF can be placed between CLOCK and GND to define other
frequencies (see image “Schematic 2” in chapter 6.6.2). It is also possible to connect an
external clock signal with a quadruplicated frequency of the micropumps frequency.
CLOCK_INT When connected to CLOCK the frequency is set to 100 Hz.

AMPLITUDE The amplitude can be set either with an analogue voltage between 0.35 V to 1.3 V, or with
an equivalent pulse-width modulation (PWM) at a voltage level of 5 V and a pulse frequency of 0.2 to 1 MHz.

TomGeorge:
Hi,This is a piezo device and as such is probably tuned to work at a particular frequency, this is why you change amplitude to change flow rate.
A higher or lower frequency will probably mean less efficiency and so less flow.
Tom... :slight_smile:

The original post says:

Adjustable parameters amplitude, frequency
Amplitude range 85 - 270 Vpp 1
Frequency range
25 - 226 Hz

Quote from: TomGeorge on Jul 03, 2016, 08:57 pm

Hi,This is a piezo device and as such is probably tuned to work at a particular frequency, this is why you change amplitude to change flow rate.
A higher or lower frequency will probably mean less efficiency and so less flow.
Tom... :)

The original post says:
Quote
Adjustable parameters amplitude, frequency
Amplitude range 85 - 270 Vpp 1
Frequency range
25 - 226 Hz

I think you guys are missing the simple fact that there is a pump and that there is a driver and that the pump runs on mains voltage of up to 270 volts and that the driver runs on 5 volts with a signal of 0.35 V to 1.3 V

and that the pump is a piezo device, well a paired set anyway, and that the pump runs on a frequency and the driver gets a clock signal at a frequency.

the best analogy is that the pump is like a stepper MOTOR
and the mp6-oem driver board, is like, well, a DRIVER

the Arduino is the controller and never controls the motor directly.

read post #15 for the text copied from the data sheet.

A link to the data sheet would be nice.

As indicated in #15, the CLOCK can/should be connected to CLK_INT (internal clock), and AMPLITUDE can/should be connected directly to a PWM output. Then the PWM duty cycle defines the flow rate. Right?

Since the OP didn't bothered to provide a link for it, I admit I haven't bothered to search and read that datasheet , but like any pump, one should be able to turn it on and off full power, and just adjust the on/off timing to change the flow accordingly.
Being a very small, ml/min piezo-driven, displacement pump, there should be no issues with inertia or startup electric surges as in motor pumps.

EDIT:
here-s a pdf (yes you got me into searching it) http://www.servoflo.com/download-archive/data-sheets/download/535/971/17

the quoted "Frequency range 25-226Hz" appears on page 8, for a mp6-EVA driver board. So that variable frequency is used as an input for the driver board. Being a displacement/piston pump, the flow is proportional with the pulse frequency.

And no, it is not powered from mains supply, the high voltage is provided by the driver board to drive the piezo actuator. The driver board takes 200-280mA from its low voltage power supply