RC with Claw/Arm combo

Hello Arduino forums!

I consider myself to have intermediate experience with Ardunio. I have a project that I'm trying to accomplish and would like some guidance:

So here are my questions: - Since I'm looking to power 2 relatively weak DC motors, can I skimp out on grabbing the Arduino motor shield and just use a servo shield instead? I'm concerned about power if I have to stack the motor shield and servo shield. I just feel like the motor shield is overkill.

  • I've seen so many guides that have DC motors connected directly to the arduino (Or to a breadboard with an RC circuit), and I've also seen so many guides that say you NEED the motor shield if you want to drive a DC motor. Can anyone clear up the ambiguity on this given my context?

Here's a super rough schematic of what I want to have done: https://i.imgur.com/Ea4nn6p.png

Can anyone shed some light on this? Maybe some suggestions/tips?

rms5643: So here are my questions: - Since I'm looking to power 2 relatively weak DC motors, can I skimp out on grabbing the Arduino motor shield and just use a servo shield instead? I'm concerned about power if I have to stack the motor shield and servo shield. I just feel like the motor shield is overkill.

  • I've seen so many guides that have DC motors connected directly to the arduino (Or to a breadboard with an RC circuit), and I've also seen so many guides that say you NEED the motor shield if you want to drive a DC motor. Can anyone clear up the ambiguity on this given my context?

DC motors need some sort of motor controller. If the motor is supposed to move both directions it needs a h-bridge. Servos have h-bridge circuits inside so they can be controlled with just an I/O pin from the Arduino. A normal DC motor can NOT be powered directly from an I/O pin. You MUST use a motor controller of some type to control a DC motor with an Arduino if you don't want to burn out the microcontroller.

The servo shield will be pretty much useless for controlling a DC motor.

DuaneDegn: DC motors need some sort of motor controller. If the motor is supposed to move both directions it needs a h-bridge. Servos have h-bridge circuits inside so they can be controlled with just an I/O pin from the Arduino. A normal DC motor can NOT be powered directly from an I/O pin. You MUST use a motor controller of some type to control a DC motor with an Arduino if you don't want to burn out the microcontroller.

The servo shield will be pretty much useless for controlling a DC motor.

DuaneDegn: DC motors need some sort of motor controller. If the motor is supposed to move both directions it needs a h-bridge. Servos have h-bridge circuits inside so they can be controlled with just an I/O pin from the Arduino. A normal DC motor can NOT be powered directly from an I/O pin. You MUST use a motor controller of some type to control a DC motor with an Arduino if you don't want to burn out the microcontroller.

The servo shield will be pretty much useless for controlling a DC motor.

Thanks for your post. Makes sense. Just picked up a motor and prototyping shields. I'll power the 6v servos with an external power supply (4 AAA or a 9V battery regulated to 6v servo input) and wire the signal wire to the IO pins of the Arduino.