Read RFID with arduino

So I have an RFID reader

In this link you can find the pinout on the rfid.

As yu can see in the link there are USB data+ and USB data- and those are the pins that are used.

The other pins, TxD and RxD, are not in use and there is no cable connected to them

Can connect the rfid with the USB cable, that comes with the RFID reader, to my arduino?

Can I use the RxD and TxD pins bye connecting them to my arduino?

I have everything ready for the rest of the project but just need to recieve data from the rfid somehow.

So if its possible that you can help me with the code too, becouse I have tried a few without any luck. Only endless loop of different numbers popping up on the serial monitor.

That PDF shows specs for 7 different devices. Are we supposed to guess which one you have? And do you the the appropriate RFI device to be read?

Paul

Those are not devices but RFID tags that can be read with this reader. check the pinout its the same that I have on my device

gahbah:
Those are not devices but RFID tags that can be read with this reader. check the pinout its the same that I have on my device

So, those are RFID tags that take 5 volts and up to 120ma to power them?

Paul

Can connect the rfid with the USB cable, that comes with the RFID reader, to my arduino?

No.

It would seem that sheet is for one reader board that will accept both 125KHz tags and 13.56MHz tags.

The USB on an Arduino is a USB client, that reader is designed to work with a USB host, like a PC. This is why USB cables have different ends to try and ensure that you never connect a host to host or client to client.

For that system to work on an Arduino using USB you would need a USB host shield and the software to drive it.

Can I use the RxD and TxD pins bye connecting them to my arduino?

Probably yes.

Only endless loop of different numbers popping up on the serial monitor.

What software at what baud rate? But that is what you would expect to see.

That so called data sheet makes no mention of the baud rate, so you must measure with it with an oscilloscope ( which you probably don't have ) so you can set the Arduino's baud rate to the same value. You need to do this before you can begin to be able to read any token numbers.

Grumpy_Mike:
No.

It would seem that sheet is for one reader board that will accept both 125KHz tags and 13.56MHz tags.

The USB on an Arduino is a USB client, that reader is designed to work with a USB host, like a PC. This is why USB cables have different ends to try and ensure that you never connect a host to host or client to client.

For that system to work on an Arduino using USB you would need a USB host shield and the software to drive it.

Is there any USB shield in particular and code to run it that you would recommened?

Grumpy_Mike:
Probably yes.

What code should I use for this?

Grumpy_Mike:
What software at what baud rate? But that is what you would expect to see.

That so called data sheet makes no mention of the baud rate, so you must measure with it with an oscilloscope ( which you probably don't have ) so you can set the Arduino's baud rate to the same value. You need to do this before you can begin to be able to read any token numbers.

Well I could try the standard baud rates that are listed: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 14400, 19200, 28800, 38400, 57600, or 115200.

If I need a specific baud rate, would it be fine if I would make the arduino an oscilloscope?
If yes is there a certain code I should run or just any code?

gahbah:
Is there any USB shield in particular and code to run it that you would recommend?

Yes. For a USB host, just get a Raspberry Pi. Various code available.

Paul__B:
Yes. For a USB host, just get a Raspberry Pi. Various code available.

Is there nothing available for arduino?

Yes, but using an assembly that has the capability natively built in and most likely drivers already provided and will come out at a similar price makes far more sense. :roll_eyes:

If I need a specific baud rate, would it be fine if I would make the arduino an oscilloscope

No the Arduino does not sample fast enough to measure the faster baud rates.

Unless you can get a better data sheet than the one you posted you face an uphill task trying to reverse engineer what you have. Not only do you need test equipment you need the knowledge of how to use it.

Given the questions you are asking then I don’t think you can do this with your present skill set.

Grumpy_Mike:
No the Arduino does not sample fast enough to measure the faster baud rates.

Unless you can get a better data sheet than the one you posted you face an uphill task trying to reverse engineer what you have. Not only do you need test equipment you need the knowledge of how to use it.

Given the questions you are asking then I don’t think you can do this with your present skill set.

https://www.elatec-rfid.com/fileadmin/Files/Data_Sheets/DS_TWN3_Multi125.pdf

Here is the datasheet. the baud rate is 9600

gahbah:
https://www.elatec-rfid.com/fileadmin/Files/Data_Sheets/DS_TWN3_Multi125.pdf

Here is the datasheet. the baud rate is 9600

That sheet shows 5 possible versions of the device. Do you have the RS-232 version? If yes, you will need a DR-232 to TTL adapter board to connect to the Arduino.

OEM board Desktop reader: T3DO-N
USB black: T3DT-NB2BEL
USB white: T3DT-NB2WEL
Serial black: T3DT-NR2BEL
Serial white: T3DT-NR2WEL

The data format for serial is given in your data sheet, but states parity can be even, odd or none. Much more information than data rate is needed. How do you set the parity option in the device. And what is the message format? The data sheet also mentions a direct access mode. What is that?

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
That sheet shows 5 possible versions of the device. Do you have the RS-232 version? If yes, you will need a DR-232 to TTL adapter board to connect to the Arduino.

I don't have the RS-232 version but the pins needed for it are not in use and are available. I tried connecting the Tx pin to arduino and get ranom numbers in a loop. when i remove the cable connected the numbers stops comping. When I put the connection back to the arduino the monitor keeps showing the numbers.

So to my understanding I cant connect the Tx pin from the reader directly to the Rx pin on arduino, therefore I need the DR-232 to TTL adapter. Or am I wrong?

So to my understanding I cant connect the Tx pin from the reader directly to the Rx pin on arduino, therefore I need the DR-232 to TTL adapter.

Yes.
But as

I don’t have the RS-232 version

Then there is little point. The fact that the pins are not used is irrelevant, there is no software behind it.

RS232 is a +/- 12V protocol which is way too much, and it is coded upside down so simply connecting it to the RX will “space out” the line and produce random letters.

Grumpy_Mike:
Yes.
But asThen there is little point. The fact that the pins are not used is irrelevant, there is no software behind it.

RS232 is a +/- 12V protocol which is way too much, and it is coded upside down so simply connecting it to the RX will “space out” the line and produce random letters.

So there is no way that I could connect this rfid to arduino anyhow?

And if so my only option will be the raspberry pi I guess

If the first document you referenced can be believed, there is a solderable jumper on the board and/or there are two pins on the connector that can be jumpered to enable the serial software.

Paul

Paul_KD7HB:
If the first document you referenced can be believed, there is a solderable jumper on the board and/or there are two pins on the connector that can be jumpered to enable the serial software.

Paul

That is what I have tried and if I do that the usb version wont work. So fi that works the rs232 to ttl might work?