Robust Microcontroller that uses arduino code?

Hi Guys,

I have made a project using the Duemilianove, I was wondering if there was a suitable microcontroller that was up to automotive standards that used the arduino code (long shot).

Basically it needs rugged case with good connectors for a loom.

I'm new to this and am not totally sure of how to go from the dev board to something found in cars such as Mote ECU (for reference).

Any help is greatly appreciated.

:grin:

The ATmega168 chip, for example, has an operating temperature range of -55°C (-67°F) to +125°C (257°F) which should be pretty good for automotive use. A basic Arduino configuration only needs 5V power, a 16MHz crystal, and a couple of capacitors. Mouser.com has plenty of metal enclosures for about $5 and any number of nice industrial connectors.

hob63: ...a suitable microcontroller that was up to automotive standards that used the arduino code (long shot). Basically it needs rugged case with good connectors for a loom.

By "microcontroller" do you mean a complete system? Case, power supply, cabling, processor?

I ask because most people consider a "microcontroller" to be this... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcontroller

Yep I meant the whole deal, if there was anyone that had the whole deal in a plug and play package :)

Go to atmel.com and search for atmega328, or 168, or whatever you'd like to use. Then search the available package/temp ranges that are available, I think you will find some that can be used in the harsher automotive world.

Keep in mind, the standard part is already rated for: 85C = 185F which is pretty warm! Part might act erratically until it cools down some. -40C = -40F, pretty cold for most parts of the world.

All the other parts used can similarly be found in wider temperature ranges also.

http://ruggedcircuits.com/index.html ?

It depends on exactly what direction of "robust" you need. "Automotive grade" products mostly tend to have an extended temperature range (sitting in blizzard at night to sitting in desert at noon), as other people have been alluding to. But the nasty parts of the automotive environment tend to be the odd transients that occur on the power rails, and the awful signals that show up on IO pins (synthetic clothing rubbing against synthetic leather, oh my!) And those you usually have to deal with external to the CPU chips themselves...

OTOH, you specifically mentioned better connectors, which is yet a different issue. There are several shields that mate an arduino to better wire connectors: http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17_21&products_id=196 http://wingshieldindustries.com/products/screwshield/

westfw: http://ruggedcircuits.com/index.html ?

It depends on exactly what direction of "robust" you need. "Automotive grade" products mostly tend to have an extended temperature range (sitting in blizzard at night to sitting in desert at noon), as other people have been alluding to. But the nasty parts of the automotive environment tend to be the odd transients that occur on the power rails, and the awful signals that show up on IO pins (synthetic clothing rubbing against synthetic leather, oh my!) And those you usually have to deal with external to the CPU chips themselves...

OTOH, you specifically mentioned better connectors, which is yet a different issue. There are several shields that mate an arduino to better wire connectors: http://www.adafruit.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=17_21&products_id=196 http://wingshieldindustries.com/products/screwshield/

Thanks for the links 8) that's close to what I'm after :D

The temperature issue is handled by buying automotive grade components. The transients are the bigger deal. See here for how nasty it can get: http://www.eet-china.com/ARTICLES/2003MAY/PDF/2003MAY26_POW_AN04.PDF

Udo

You did mention Arduino, so it also relates to software. I'm in doubt as if the software made with some Arduino libs would be accepted according to the automotive standards for embedded software. I have read that document before, but right now I have no idea of where I found it. :(