Servo’s best for analog gauge cluster?

Hello, I’m in the planning phase of an idea I’ve long had.

I’d like to use a MKR1000 WIFI to drive a series of servos acting as analog gauges. I’m going to use the Arduino to read data from my personal weather station’s API at a certain interval (5 minutes or so). It would in turn rotate the servos to match.

I’m trying to recreate the look of brass and glass, nautical style, real analog weather gauges.

Does having an Arduino drive servos seem like the best approach?

I’ve done a lot of Googling and can’t find any projects like these. I’ve even tried watching videos from the car/flight sim community but I can’t seem to find anything to copy.

It was my choice on a model boat for the tacho.
At the time a simple code (only a few lines actually) was sketched up for a picaxe 8m micro and used a 5gm servo with gears on the output to turn the normal rotation into 270 degree movement on the needle.
Works great.
Meter itself is 20mm diameter.

The meter was designed and drawn up using Jim Tonnes meter software (basic version) At US$55 for the full version it is a bit out of reach for hobby use but the basic version is fine.

http://tonnesoftware.com/meter.html

IMG_9496.jpg

IMG_9496.jpg

Similar to what's used in actual auto clusters with real needles.

Servos are good for large-dial meters like a classroom thermometer. Then the students get to ‘calibrate’ it… You can also use the “dial cord” mechanism like OldSkool radios did. Two different-size pulleys, fish line, and a small spring to keep the tension applied.

Small steppers would work well also, especially if you need 270 or more degrees. But you have to have them periodically find a Home position and then move to the indicated value. OH: Just like the ones in my Tahoe dashboard…

I was thinking that needing to zero a stepper adds complexity, which made me look to servos.

Could I drive 4 small servos directly from an Arduino knowing they’ll never see a load more than turning a dial needle?

ebfoxbat:
I was thinking that needing to zero a stepper adds complexity, which made me look to servos.

Could I drive 4 small servos directly from an Arduino knowing they’ll never see a load more than turning a dial needle?

Doesn’t matter what load the servos see as you are only driving the signal from the Arduino.
Power to the servo comes from a separate supply normally.
Don’t forget the common ground.