Share tips you have come across

LarryD:
:o 0201s :o
Don't sneeze!

I assume you have a Microscope.

Funny you say that. I seem to have picked up a nasty cold. As for the microscope, not a desktop unit yet. I'm using 25x loupe glasses. The focal length is a bit tight with a rework gun. I'm looking for a nice microscope like you have.

LarryD:
I was going to suggest that you make one of these:

I have one. I think it would just suck them up. I bought plenty of spares. I think 100 were only $1.

fettkeewl:
Dont be afraid to add stuff you need directly on a board ^^

This is a programming board for the ESP8266-01 that I modified with a button and two wires.
In standard operating mode the esp8266 will run its loaded firmware / arduino code when plugged in,
however holding the button when connecting your device pulls gpio0 to ground allowing you to program the device.

The button is hot glued to the female header. Could do 1 more on the opposite side for device reset…

Yes, we all add things sooner or later to existing circuits.

You can use small pieces of PCB material, glue them to an existing PCB then add components to these pieces.

Here is a discussion on the process.

Edit:
Try a small drop of ‘Super Glue’ on motherboard and small smear of ‘Super Glue Accelerator’ on the bottom of the cutout pad.

Add components to a PCB.

Board segments

Came across this technique while back, I do like it for adding things to PCBs.

Thank you LarryD!
It is so inspiring!

Any thoughts on this model microscope? /s-l1600.jpg]twin boom[/url] |500x500

It has a working distance of 4in. There is a cheaper model with single arm with a working distance of 6in. |500x500

I need something, but it has to work. The second one is half the cost of the first ($170/$370)

This is the one I settled on and got. 65 pounds weight!
It has simul-focus so the third eye piece is independent of the two front ones.

I definitely recommend it.

Jiggy-Ninja:
If you’ve got some thing you need to use frequently that requires a complicated wiring arrangement, make a jig on some protoboard so you will know it works every time and not have to fiddle around with troubleshooting it every time you wire it up.

I made jigs for reprogramming chips outside of an Arduino board.

Above are two examples of programming jigs I made. One is a ZIF socket soldered onto a protoshield that lets me use the ArduinoISP sketch on an Uno to program a chip (in this case, an ATtiny4313).

The other is some male headers soldered onto a 6-wide protoboard. The 2x3 header on top lets me plug in the standard programmer ribbon cable, and the headers on bottom are spaced just wide enough to be able to plug this over a DIP package in a breadboard. You just need to grab the right jig and plug it over the chip to reprogram it in circuit. The one pictured is made for an ATtiny85.

I have one of each jig made for ATtiny85, ATtiny84, ATtiny4313, and ATmega328P.

Which reminds me, I need to whip some up for the ATtiny10 and various PICs I bought.

Further to this, here is how I make up a shield like yours.
After coming up with the schematic, I import an image of the front and back of the ‘Shield’ into a program like Snagit.
I get images of the components to be mounted and size them to 1:1
After placing the components at the best locations for my application I layout how the wires are to be run.
I then print out a 2:1 paper copy.
I solder things up as shown in the images below.

I use wire warp wire or magnet wire to make interconnections.
Wire Wrap Wire 30AWG

38AWG Roadrunner/Vero wire

Vero Wire

Soldering temperature: 400°C to 480°C

IR Shield.jpg

2017-01-20_22-09-23.jpg

WARNING the PCB linked in POST # 14 has a circuit error. >:(
**You MUST corrected this error before you plug it onto an Arduino. **
See Post #14 for the corrected image.
.

Point to Point wiring PDF guide for breadboards.

Attached is the PDF file with all the instruction images.

.

Poin to Point breadboard wiring.pdf (1.05 MB)

For those who are interested, here are 600DPI images for some common protoboards.

Three and Four.

And Five.

This THREAD started pretty well

The basic idea is excellent.

However, as everyone can see it ended up in a complete mess.

I really wish there was a separate tab in the arduino forum with problem solutions and technical hints.

I am thinking of a collection of solutions.

Good ones, bad ones, .... there should be a structure, so you can find what you expect to find.

arduinoaleman: However, as everyone can see it ended up in a complete mess.

Seems your post would tend to push it in that direction.

arduinoaleman: there should be a structure, so you can find what you expect to find.

If you want structure use the Arduino Playground. Forum threads are not suited to organizing information. Their only valid use is discussion.

arduinoaleman:
This THREAD started pretty well

The basic idea is excellent.

However, as everyone can see it ended up in a complete mess.

I really wish there was a separate tab in the arduino forum with
problem solutions and technical hints.

I am thinking of a collection of solutions.

Good ones, bad ones, … there should be a structure,
so you can find what you expect to find.

What’s here that shouldn’t be?

There are a lot of hobbyists here and there must be some unique ways of doing things that others could benefit from knowing about.
Hoping people would contribute their ideas but that failed quite miserably.

In closing, I cannot get things working quite right. :frowning:

2017-01-21_15-29-56.jpg

.

it ended up in a complete mess.

I think the complete mess is all in your mind.

Thank you for the ideas LarryD.

Please go through the whole THREAD

it started so nice .....

No matter if like you my words (see above) or not

Just say what you think - in case you dare.

This forum requires better questions (most of the time it is hard to understand the original problem)

and this forum requires better answers.

Do not answer questions when the question is not clear. Before giving an answer, better ask another question.

The

GOOD OLD BOYS are doing this. The Newbees ..... ?

Quite..

but many people posting here are entirely new to an exciting new hobby (for them) and need encouragement and help - which many experienced engineers here are glad to give.

Perhaps some of them will go on to be the professional engineers of the future.

Naturally much of it is unstructured and ignorant - but not to be despised.

This isn't a place for IEE(E) learned papers

I've made loads of cock-ups myself - haven't we all?

"it seemed a good idea at the time.. duh"

regards

Allan

Maybe it has something to do with some posters not speaking English as a first language.

Perhaps it has something to do with a barely in the teens kid getting an Arduino for their birthday and trying to play around with it.

Then there's always the middle aged guys who want to do a specific task and are trying to make what they want to accomplish the task.

If a post doesn't meet your expectations, you don't have to click on it, and certainly don't have to feel obliged to read each and every post.

All the posts Larry has made are great. Personally, I might only use a few to meet my needs, but others might find other tips useful. I doubt I would ever buy my wife a power supply for her birthday, because I'm positive she is in more need of a stereo microscope, but hey, it gave me the idea.

I made one of these a while back. Works quite well.

Use Loctite in the holes.

http://vpapanik.blogspot.ca/?view=classic

|500x278

Edit You can add more weight at the end with a neodymium magnet.

Going to have to try this:

|500x375

Edit: See post 124 and 210

.

Now see, brilliant stuff like that is what this thread was made for!

In #59, bottom photo, is that a fan?