Soldering Arduino UNO

Hello everyone.

I recently completed a project which required a definitive version, so i soldered the components on a PCB and closed everything in a 3D-Printed case.
Now the question was, should i keep it wired to the Arduino UNO or can i use another version for the definitive project, like the Nano or the Micro?
Thanks!

A Nano or a Pro Mini (with ATmega328p) is exactly the same as a Uno but more "permanent friendly".* For the Pro Mini you need a separate serial adapter but it's smaller and cheaper.

*And I even think they are more debug/breadboard friendly as well.

septillion:
A Nano or a Pro Mini (with ATmega328p) is exactly the same as a Uno but more "permanent friendly".* For the Pro Mini you need a separate serial adapter but it's smaller and cheaper.

*And I even think they are more debug/breadboard friendly as well.

So, if the Nano has the same pins of the UNO, i will use it for sure... does it also have a usb port?
Which are the differences?
Thank you for your help :slight_smile:

The Arduino’s all have a product page with such details, but basically I believe the Nano is like a Pro Mini plus a USB port, so its a little larger. For permanent projects the Pro Mini saves the cost of the USB interface, but
you’ll need a USB serial cable to program it.

Nano is similar to Uno. Only the USB chip is different.

jendalinda:
Nano is similar to Uno. Only the USB chip is different.

And they have the same number of pin?

And to solder something wired to an Arduino MEGA what can i use?

And they have the same number of pin?

Yes

You normally solder a wire to a row of pin header strip and plug that into your Arduino.

Nano and Pro Mini are both direct substitutes for the Uno; the difference is that the Nano has a USB-serial converter in it (like the Uno does) while on the pro mini, you have to use an external USB-serial converter (They're like $2/ea - IMO the good ones are the black ones with the little voltage switch that come up on ebay search for "CH340G 6pin" ). You generally use a nano if you're going to be using the USB routinely, or a pro mini if you aren't planning to use the USB during normal operation.

There isn't a standard "mini-Mega" - though there are a few third party minimalist mega compatible boards, including this one which looks like it might be good?
New Small Meduino Mega2560 R3 Pro Mini ATMEGA16U2(Arduino Mega2560 Compatible) | eBay (no specific endorsement of this one, other than that it looks cost-competitive with full size mega clones)

As others have said, I think the ideal case is to use header pins and a piece of prototyping board, though - or even a prototyping shield if using a full-size board like Uno/Mega:


(That's one of my designs, available from my Tindie store - There are a lot of variations on the prototyping shield from other vendors)

Noshirt:
And they have the same number of pin?

A Nano has two more analogue inputs (A6, A7).

Compared to an Uno, the Nano has some power differences/limitiations.
The Nano runs on ~4.6volt (not 5volt) on USB supply, because of a simple diode instead of mosfet backflow protection. You might get different results from the A/D if your code relies on 5volt Aref.
You can't draw as much current for sensors etc. from the 5volt pin on external/raw supply, because of the smaller board heatsink of the regulator, and the 3.3volt pin can only supply ~30mA instead of ~150mA.

Post the details of your project if you want to know if you can replace the Uno with a Nano or ProMini.
Leo..

You can also use something like Nano terminal adapter. Quite sure that you can get it cheaper on ebay.

That is probably the nicest protoshield available

Wawa:
A Nano has two more analogue inputs (A6, A7).

Compared to an Uno, the Nano has some power differences/limitiations.
The Nano runs on ~4.6volt (not 5volt) on USB supply, because of a simple diode instead of mosfet backflow protection. You might get different results from the A/D if your code relies on 5volt Aref.
You can't draw as much current for sensors etc. from the 5volt pin on external/raw supply, because of the smaller board heatsink of the regulator, and the 3.3volt pin can only supply ~30mA instead of ~150mA.

Post the details of your project if you want to know if you can replace the Uno with a Nano or ProMini.
Leo..

Well, i'm using a Mega and an UNO because i'm doing a transmitter/receiver project.
For the transmitter i'm using the mega, and there are plugged a LCD display, two leds, an HC-SR04 and a nRF24L01 upgraded version.
For the receiver, smaller, i'm using the UNO, and i plugged an HC-SR04, one led and a nRF24L01.

Which are your advices?