[Solved] Low- vs high-quality breadboards?

I probably have around 300 solderless-breadboard connections in my project. But still, I'm surprised how difficult it is to keep all connections conducting at low impedance ( zero ohms). For example, when I still hear music even though the volume control (5k pot) is turned all the way down, it's likely the ground connection on the pot to the breadboard needs to be jiggled a little.

So now I'm wondering: Are some breadboards significantly better than others? Might I have bought a cheap breadboard, where a more expensive one would have avoided these headaches?

Videos I've watched such as Solderless Breadboards: How to & Common Problems don't mention board-quality as a concern, but you guys would know. If quality is a significant factor, what replacement breadboards should I purchase?

Breadboards are not designed for anything but prototyping - the contact springs get dirty or corroded and connections can become unreliable. Reliable spring connections are gold-plated, I've never heard of a gold-plating in a breadboard though.

There are definitely better and worse breadboards, though I wouldn't know how to easily distinguish between them other than to avoid buying on eBay.

Project with 300 breadboards.

Never seen that.

Picture?

Maybe time to learn how to "Eagle" a circuit board. A custom double-sided 8x10cm circuit board can be made for $2-$3 including posting. Leo..

Wawa: Project with 300 breadboards.

Never seen that.

Picture?

Hahahaha! You really did make me laugh! I said "around 300 solderless-breadboard connections". That's 300 or so wires and leads plugged into the little holes. That portion of the project is on two 6.5-inch breadboards snapped together.

Duhh.

That's pretty much why I don't use solderless breadboards - they are just too flaky. Every time I see someone try to show me something on a breadboard, there's always a 10 minute wait while they poke at things to make it work.

I prefer solderable breadboards - PCBs with pins in groups so you can solder to them, like this: |500x252

I sell boards like this on my tindie shop (of course, this means I'm biased ;-) ) http://tindie.com/stores/drazzy

I don't know the answer but it wouldn't be surprising if quality was not uniform. The same may be true of jumpers. Jumper length could also be an issue.

I have almost never had a problem with breadboarded circuits. But I've never built one with 300 jumpers. Usually it's more like 50 jumpers, or 100-150 holes used.

|500x294

There is no such thing as a six month old reliable solder less bread board. It is an oxymoron.

Grumpy_Mike: There is no such thing as a six month old reliable solder less bread board. It is an oxymoron.

Then I own an oxymoron. Two, since I hacksawed in half. They're actually a year old now.

Bud has been around for a while an I think I used to use them with few complaints:

http://www.newark.com/bud-industries/bb-32621/breadboard-solderless-removable/dp/88W3961

jboyton: Then I own an oxymoron. Two, since I hacksawed in half. They're actually a year old now.

Then you have not tested it sufficiently.

I still have a breadboard in use that might be more than 25 years old.
No problems for short term experiments.
I never use breadboards for semi-permanent circuits.
Leo…

Something with that many connections, I would use island of holes perfboard and wirewrap it up with wirewrap sockets and headers. Last thing I want to do is deal with connection issues.

Grumpy_Mike: Then you have not tested it sufficiently.

I haven't tested them to failure. But they work without worry every time I use them, including with semi-permanent circuits (weeks, months). I do expect them to wear out eventually.

Are soldered circuits 100% trouble free?

Properly soldered circuits are 100% trouble free in my experience.

Wirewrap too. The fencing machines at my club were all built using wirewrap, 4+ years old now and still going.

CrossRoads:
Properly soldered circuits are 100% trouble free in my experience.

Are 100% of soldered circuits soldered “properly”?

I can only speak to assembly my wife & I do: yes. I don't know what capability/skill you or others have.

Yeah, I know. It was a rhetorical question.

I soldered one semi-temporary circuit on a proto board and it worked fine. It took a lot longer. And when I was done with it I had a board I didn't need anymore. I couldn't easily recover anything from it. So it's a paper weight now and I guess I'll just throw it out. It seems wasteful.

I just ordered another breadboard yesterday.

i have never had problems with digital bread board circuits they work or thy dont.

Analogue though are a different problem bad connections can cause all sorts of problems.