Test Platform for Arduino

Is there any interest in a test platform to simplify testing and de-bugging with the Arduino?

If you imagine that you can insert your Arduino into a small fixture that holds it down and touches off on the bottom of the digital/analog pins. These pins could be multiplexed to a few BNC connectors and/or header.

This way you can connect an oscilloscope, logic analyzer or DMM to any of the pins on the Arduino without having to disconnect each instrument and move it to a new pin. The test system would allow you to decide which pins to connect to which instrument (via switches or GUI).

The motivation (at least in my experience), is that it is very annoying and messy to monitor signals on the Arduino given the female headers - especially with stackable shields.

Or we could just dispense with the bulky, expensive unos and use nanos with male pin header... I suspect that few people who would know what to do with an oscilloscope are using shields and uno's.

Sounds like a solution in search of a problem.

Plug a 10 cent row of male pins into the female connector(s) and attach your scope lead to the protruding pins. How difficult is that?

If you imagine that you can insert your Arduino into a small fixture that holds it down and touches off on the bottom of the digital/analog pins. These pins could be multiplexed to a few BNC connectors and/or header.

Such a thing is known as a “bed of nails test fixture” and is ubiquitous in electronics manufacture.
The pins are spring loaded and known as pogo pins, there are several styles of ends of these pins.

Depending on the size these things cost in excess of £1000.

A vacuum fixture uses a bed of nails and sucks the unit under test down onto the pogo pins.
In the old days, a functional tester would isolate the processor (tristate the buses), and exercise all the peripherals and memory with emulated processor I/O cycles.
Much harder to do today, with higher levels of integration, so JTAG is used much more.

'328P does not have JTAG.

Can use a screw shield between the Arduino stacked shield as another way to access pins.

Or use female headers stuck onto the Arduino female headers and then stack the shield as a way to have more room to clip lead onto. Saleae 16 channel logic analyzer will let you look at all the digital signals, if you know how to interpret them.

At the same time, it's pretty easy to write a sketch to manipulate single pins to see if they can be written high/low or read back high/low signals or analog levels.