The best battery to power Arduino with two servo

I am planning to build a project to run 7 volts and I need some suggestion to power Arduino uno like long last battery some says Li- Battery and other is AA rechargeable

Gasoline powered generator charging a car battery.

Do you think you should offer just a bit more information?

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larryd: Gasoline powered generator charging a car battery.

No way. You need a nuclear power plant and a bank of super capacitors.

What servos, how much are they used and how long is "long last"? 5 minutes? 5 years?

Steve

larryd: Gasoline powered generator charging a car battery.

I saw that once. A little 3HP gas engine running a 225 amp alternator charging a car battery. Granted it was 12VDC only, but 225 amps and about the same size as an 800W 120V suitcase generator. It was a cute little thing, and a heck of an idea.

6V SLA with very-low drop-out 5V regulator for Arduino?

kennethgomad02: I am planning to build a project and I need some suggestion to power Arduino uno like long last battery some says Li- Battery and other is AA rechargeable

First, we need to know what voltage you want to run at and what voltage the servo motors require. Since you say UNO, you need 7-12VDC. The 7V minimum voltage will be an issue when dealing with the LiPo cells. NiCd/NiMh rechargeable cells can be stacked to give you whatever voltage (in 1.2V increments) you want, then remove them to recharge.

Second you will need to put a current meter on the power supply you are using to find out the maximum requirement. This number will tell you how many milliamp (or amp) hours are needed for the capacity of the battery.

If you can change from the UNO to another ATMEGA823 based board, I would check out https://www.arduino.cc/en/Products/Compare and select a board that can take 5V in. Then you can get a simple single or parallel 3.7V LiPo battery pack and a good LiPo charger with a voltage boosted output (converting the dropping 3.7V into a stable 5V).

I have just recently done a series of battery powered projects with the Arduino Pro Mini and AdaFruit PowerBoost 1000C. The only catches I will note, is to watch the processor speed on the Pro Mini (3.3V=8Mhz, 5V=16Mhz same as UNO) and read the PowerBoost documentation thoroughly and carefully as to how to wire and fully shutdown the PowerBoost module.