using arduino to control stepper motor for video turntable.

Hello all! I’m new to this group, and electronics.

I have a nema 23 stepper motor and rotary table that I’d like to use as a variable speed turntable for shooting video of our chocolate products for my chocolate store. I’ll mount it table up, with a 12" aluminum disk, anodized black, for the tabletop.

I have no electronic experience. I’ve read that that working with the arduino circuit board is straight forward, and relatively easy, so I’d like to build this with an arduino.

I need variable speed 0-10 rpm, forward and reverse, knob or button controlled, because I would constantly be adjusting the speed. It would be nice to be able to run a specific rpm for a specific amount of time, stop for a specific amount of time, and then repeat that pattern as many times as I choose. Right now I just need the basic 0-10rpm and reverse, though.

If anyone out there is interested in helping, I need a list of hardware to complete this, and instructions on how to put it all together. I’ve attached an image of the stepper and rotary table.

Thanks!
John R.

Do you have a datasheet? http://www.linengineering.com/stepper-motors/5718.aspx Can't even find one here.

I couldn't find a data sheet either. This motor is from the forth axis of one of my Taig cnc mills. What information do I need on the motor? I can call Taig tomorrow and get what is needed.

Thanks.

You need to know what current the motor requires so that you can get a suitable stepper driver board.

I would not be surprised if your motor is over-specced for your application. If the turntable is mounted on good bearings it should not require much torque to rotate it slowly.

It may be cheaper to buy a smaller motor so that you can work with a cheaper stepper driver. But that depends on the specs for your existing motor.

You may also find that a simple geared DC motor would do the job - unless you need the precise location that a stepper can provide.

...R Stepper Motor Basics Simple Stepper Code

Thanks. I contacted LIN, and they told me that the motor is proprietary to "Flexible Technologies Inc." I'll contact them tomorrow and get the specs.

I like the idea of using the rotary table, we have some large gift boxes, and who knows what I'll end up rotating...

I also already have the motor and table, so it would be nice to put this to use for something.

John

Here is the spec sheet for that motor.

5718L-10D Datasheet.pdf (79.2 KB)

I am sure you are aware a stepper motor is called that for a reason. It moves in steps and may cause all kinds of problems with your camera frame rate. Can you synchronize the camera framing with the stepper movement?

Paul

livetosculpt: Here is the spec sheet for that motor.

It seems that motor only requires 1 amp so it should be easy to control it via (for example) a Pololu DRV8825 stepper driver.

(I had been concerned, because of its size, that it would have needed more current)

...R

Thanks Robin. I'll order a Pololu stepper driver DRV8825. And I'm guessing that the Arduino Uno is all I need in addition. What would be the best controller for speed?

Paul: We shoot at 24p and 60p. When I video my cnc's running, there doesn't seem to be an issue.

John

livetosculpt: And I'm guessing that the Arduino Uno is all I need in addition. What would be the best controller for speed?

The speed won't be affected by your choice of Arduino board. But maybe I am not answering the question in your mind.

...R

livetosculpt:
Thanks Robin. I’ll order a Pololu stepper driver DRV8825. And I’m guessing that the Arduino Uno is all I need in addition. What would be the best controller for speed?

Paul: We shoot at 24p and 60p. When I video my cnc’s running, there doesn’t seem to be an issue.

John

Keep in mind, the stepper motor ALWAYS steps to the next step at the same speed. The pause between the steps is what you change with the controller. A lot of the power going to the stepper motor is for holding position between steps.

Paul

So then maybe I should get a DC motor, seeing that I don't need to hold position, just smoothly rotate at slow speeds.

livetosculpt: So then maybe I should get a DC motor, seeing that I don't need to hold position, just smoothly rotate at slow speeds.

As suggested in Reply #3

The advantage of the stepper is that it is trivially easy to make the speed accurate. And maybe, using microsteps, the jitter would not be a problem. If you already have the stepper motor it would be worth experimenting.

...R