Wanting to hire someone to write code

Hello,
I am new to Arduino and i am making a "Back to the Future Plutonium Gauge" for display.
If possible i need code to run the gauges with lights, a servo motor and sound, as seen in the movies. I want it to have 3 options.

Switch 1. Activates gauge needles by servo, turns on 4 led lights to illuminate gauges and activates sound as heard in movie.

Switch 2. Activates "Empty" sequence which drops needles to zero by servo, activates red flashing led and alarm sound as heard in movie.

Switch 3. Run 1 and 2 in "Demo" mode that loops the two previous options

If you google "plutonium gauge sequnce" the first two results are exactly what i want( not sure if i can link others youtube video here)
Please let me know if you are able to help!
Thank you!
Lance

Sure am I able to help :slight_smile:

This instrument panel on the right ?

You may be able to purchase the whole car for around $100,000 or maybe, with luck, just the plutonium gauges
http://www.timemachineforsale.com/faq.html

or do en ebay.com search for: "analog meter milliamps" and you get quite close to the three instruments.

Thanks, yes i have all the physical parts to make the gauges, i just Need help with the code to make it all come to life, as ive previously stated.

noiasca:
Do you have the hardware available?
If yes how fast can you ship it to one of your helpers?
If not - how fast can you order the devices and ship it to the helper?
What is your estimation how long it will take to program?
What are you willing to pay for this project?

Yes i believe i have most everything i need, i really just need help with the code. I dont really have a time frame, not in a rush. I can pay whatever is charged, im not sure what someone would be paid for this job.

Either payed by hour or for the whole project. Problem is, without propper task definition the job can go from some hours to some weeks. If it's just the 3 panels on the picture, question still is what should they do/show? Real instruments work better than try-to-emulate-real-instrument-with-servo-thingies - just my experience from building flight sims :slight_smile:

zwieblum:
Either payed by hour or for the whole project. Problem is, without propper task definition the job can go from some hours to some weeks. If it’s just the 3 panels on the picture, question still is what should they do/show? Real instruments work better than try-to-emulate-real-instrument-with-servo-thingies - just my experience from building flight sims :slight_smile:

The instruments themselves need to have the needles move on the gauges when activated and then zero out when out of fuel (when the alarm would sound and a red flashing LED would activate).
I have the real gauges, I am just not sure how to program them to move? I am assuming that activating lights and sound is fairly simple, I just have no idea on how to write the code to do it. I have found others online who have done all this in the past, but used older tech that again I have no idea on how to program or use. what would be needed to know the proper task definition?

roeteng meter.PNG

20181012_224918.jpg : you'd at least need to connect the 2. pole .. and do some measuring (coil resistance, ...)

The Roentgen meter indicates it has a full scale deflection of 100uA. That should mean that driving it at 5v through a 50K resistor should cause the meter needle to swing fully right.
If instead of driving it at 5volts directly, you drive it via a low pass filter (consisting of simply a capacitor and resistor) connected to a PWM capable Arduino pin, you can vary the meter swing using the Arduino’s analogWrite() statement. You’d still need the 50k series resistor for this.
Wha does the servo in your parts list do?

6v6gt:
The Roentgen meter indicates it has a full scale deflection of 100uA. That should mean that driving it at 5v through a 50K resistor should cause the meter needle to swing fully right.
If instead of driving it at 5volts directly, you drive it via a low pass filter (consisting of simply a capacitor and resistor) connected to a PWM capable Arduino pin, you can vary the meter swing using the Arduino’s analogWrite() statement. You’d still need the 50k series resistor for this.
Wha does the servo in your parts list do?

The servo was to move the needles before I knew I could power them directly. I am very novice with this sort of thing.

One picture shows a green circuit board with an Arduino mini pro with 3 connections to each meter and a cable going somewhere else. The 6 header pins on the Arduino are to program it through a cheap FTDI type programmer.

Did you acquire this all as a complete working system or who put it all together? If you bought it online, can you include a link to the product page?
To me, it looks like at least all the hardware is there. If someone has already gone that far, then I would also imagine some software is there as well.

What is at the other end of that cable which has 4 wires (black,red,yellow,white) ? Can you include a picture of what ever is there?

The 3 switches you mentioned in your first post. Are they already mounted on this panel?
Is some sort of sound unit (say SDCard player module with loud speaker ) also included with this kit ?

It could be (although I’m not suggesting that you try it yet) that you simply attach it to a power supply and it will already do something like go through a test routine.

Once it is clear what is already there, then the next step is determining what has to be done additionally for it to meet your requirements.

Edit
——

  1. I’ve just noticed that the there is an unconnected tab on the back of each meter. This would appear to be one of the coil connections (if those are really conventional analog meters). In that case, maybe only the panel meter backlights are active.
  2. Is the picture of the plutonium chamber meter from the exact kit you have or is it from another source? It may be that the 100uA full scale deflection does not apply to your meters.

6v6gt:
One picture shows a green circuit board with an Arduino mini pro with 3 connections to each meter and a cable going somewhere else. The 6 header pins on the Arduino are to program it through a cheap FTDI type programmer.

Did you acquire this all as a complete working system or who put it all together? If you bought it online, can you include a link to the product page?
To me, it looks like at least all the hardware is there. If someone has already gone that far, then I would also imagine some software is there as well.

What is at the other end of that cable which has 4 wires (black,red,yellow,white) ? Can you include a picture of what ever is there?

The 3 switches you mentioned in your first post. Are they already mounted on this panel?
Is some sort of sound unit (say SDCard player module with loud speaker ) also included with this kit ?

It could be (although I’m not suggesting that you try it yet) that you simply attach it to a power supply and it will already do something like go through a test routine.

Once it is clear what is already there, then the next step is determining what has to be done additionally for it to meet your requirements.

Edit
——

  1. I’ve just noticed that the there is an unconnected tab on the back of each meter. This would appear to be one of the coil connections (if those are really conventional analog meters). In that case, maybe only the panel meter backlights are active.
  2. Is the picture of the plutonium chamber meter from the exact kit you have or is it from another source? It may be that the 100uA full scale deflection does not apply to your meters.

The pictures posted are just examples I found online of what others have done. I have two “VICTOREEN CDV-715 1A RADIATION DETECTOR 54510” meters and one “Simpson Model 29, 4.5” panel, 0-50 milliAmpere Seconds Meter".

OK. The pictures here (post #12) are clearly not related to those in post #7.

The round meter with the R/hr scale on the Geiger counter looks like it could be used easily.

The other one with the scale Milliampere second looks also like it could be used. I'm guessing that was intended to be used by some sort of energy measuring circuit (the scale implies it is a cumulative measurement) but the meter itself is probably a standard low milliamp type.

The above two appear to be moving coil type meters and the worst you'd have to do is remove an internal shunt or resistor network.

Panel meters with a non linear scale (moving iron types as found on say battery chargers) may be more difficult to use.

You could attempt to connect a 1.5volt battery with a 100K ohm series resistor to see if the meter needles kick over. Even if they fail that test, it does not mean they cannot be used, but such experiments could damage the meter if not done cautiously.