Wire and Connector Question

I've got a prototype completed and working and want to move it into an enclosure. I'd like to use wire connectors to the Arduino and the other components that have more than just a single pin. For my I2C board I found a Molex part that will work nicely. The Molex is female and the I2C board has male pins. I'm basically looking for a male version of this style connector.

I've thought of just using pin header cut to the correct length, with wire soldered on to the short pins but was hoping there might be something more finished out there.

Thanks.

The first step is identifying a components supplier - so which territory are you?

United States. I’ve looked at Mouser, Digikey, and others. Biggest problem is the shear number of connectors they have available.

Well, the most obvious choice for connecting to a PC board with 0.1" spaced pins is dupont connectors (search eBay for: Dupont Connector). Put 0.1" pin header on the board, and use female dupont connectors (the male dupont connectors are less robust, and a male connector + female header is almost twice as tall). I get the jumper wire with the pins on it, but no housings: http://www.ebay.com/itm/40pcs-Dupont-Jumper-Cable-Wire-1P-Female-Pins-Connector-2-54mm-20cm-DIY-/131316002068 and then just put the appropriate pin housing onto it - crimping the connector ends on is a real pain in the ass, even with the appropriate crimp tool.

For a slightly more durable connector, on 0.1" spacing, the KK-100 connector is common and pretty good.

Molex is a company. They have hundreds of product lines.

Whatever you do, pick something common and in widespread use. That way, you'll have no trouble getting extra parts if you need them, and the leftovers are more likely to be useful in a future project.

If you're connecting two boards together, of course, you can use

The dupont connectors look close to what I need. I would like a one piece connector that can house multiple male pins. That connector would then plug into the female header(s) on the board. Basically a multi conductor version of the pin jumpers used in bread-boarding. With this I can build a wiring harness.

If it isn't available I could just glue together a bunch of single pin connectors to make what I want/need.

Thanks!

They could hardly be considered difficult to come by.

controlmech:
Basically a multi conductor version of the pin jumpers used in bread-boarding. With this I can build a wiring harness.

These are called "connector housings".

You buy them without the wire or pins, and insert the pins into them. If you start from jumpers that have 1-pin housings on them, you can pop them off by lifting that flap that latches the pin in place with a safety pin or other similarly pokey object, but it's easier to use the ones that come without the 1-pin housings on them (I linked to one example of pre-pinned but no-housing dupont line above)

Have a look at the Molex SL modular connector range. Very similar to the DuPont connectors, but also have a latching mechanism.

Ian.

Paul__B - So you can put male or female pins in these housings? I've got some male by female jumpers here, I guess I'll give it a try and then get some of the housings on the way. Thanks.

controlmech:
So you can put male or female pins in these housings?

Exactly - if you already have the male pins in those housings (you can try very carefully lifting the “latch” to slip off the housing), the same housing works for male and female.

Makes a very neat arrangement.

crimp housings

and terminated wires

Examples:

Or use a screw shield
http://www.crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17/


Alright then. Paul__B and CrossRoads, thank you, I have a much better understanding of the connectors now. I'm just assuming they don't build the Arduino boards with male headers to prevent accidental shorts.

I think female headers work better for installing male-equipped shields onto.

CrossRoads:
I think female headers work better for installing male-equipped shields onto.

That would appear to be a tautology! Although in these PC (politically correct) times I may have to be careful - perhaps we are not permitted to discriminate! :astonished:

controlmech:
I'm just assuming they don't build the Arduino boards with male headers to prevent accidental shorts.

That would be a very reasonable supposition. Male headers are ipso facto, more fragile. (I think it is safer to criticise males - or is it? :~)