1st schematic

can someone please look over my schematic. this is the 1st one I have ever done and not even sure if it is done correctly.

j1 and j2 will hook up to 12v solenioid’s
j3 and j4 will go to float switches

thanks

Typically, grounds always point down, positive voltage supplies always point up.

Take a look at the links in my signature lines for some tips on how to draw schematics with clarity in mind.

You have the two MOSFETs wired incorrectly. You've got control going to the drain, and the load connected to the gate....

Typically you should have a .1uf capacitor, input to ground, on the regulator.
I would like to see the negative of the battery going to a ground symbol.
You need decoupling on the tiny power leads.
A clearer image would be nice.
.

You need a 0.1 uf cap, but that's not where is put it. You need one across power and ground to the attiny as close to the chip as possible (I've had to trash batches of pubs just cause it was too far from the chip. Decoupling is no joke).

You also need caps on the output and input of the regulator. I can't make out the part number; read the datasheet - they tell you what kind of caps(some are picky)

Perfect, thankyou for this. When i get home i will work on those issues and try again.

Any idea's on what to use for a more clear image?

Any idea's on what to use for a more clear image?

ZOOM in and save to a file to be uploaded :wink:

If you have a scanner or good cam, hand draw. Or if you are designing in Eagle anyway, use eagle and spend the time to make it nice (its not a trivial length of time to make it pretty even if you are already good with eagle)

If you are drawing your schematic in Eagle, something that is not obvious (especially to beginners) is you need to draw the connections with the "net" command, not the "wire" command. Wire is for drawing lines (which makes sense as wires in board layout, but not necessarily in drawing the schematic). Net is for connecting things together in a network.

The first thing I would say is correct the orientation - ground at the bottom, current
flows down, signals propagate to the right, whereever possible. It makes the circuit
unreadable otherwise. JP1 and JP2 are meaningless names for jumpers, name according
to function if you can.

Don't be afraid to break the diagram into separate pieces using signal labels - each portion
is then clearer and more readable.

kau_cinta_ku:
Any idea's on what to use for a more clear image?

Yes, see the links in my signature for tips on how to draw schematics for clarity.

Post them larger.

There are a number of programs with schematic capture like LTSpice, KICAD, Eagle, DipTrace, Fritzing, etc. Or just draw it with pencil and paper, take a picture and upload it.

@polymorph

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Hi,

There are a number of programs with schematic capture like LTSpice, KICAD, Eagle, DipTrace, Fritzing, etc. Or just draw it with pencil and paper, take a picture and upload it.

Go and wash your mouth out with soap and water. Fritzy ??
Also try ExpressPCB, google it.

Tom.... :slight_smile:

My hair gets Fritzy. :frowning:

Do i dare ask why the "Fr******" program is so hated around here for? Lol

I guess it's not that bad :wink:
Stuff like this is usually posted:

lol Ok that makes plenty of sence now

kau_cinta_ku:
Do i dare ask why the "Fr******" program is so hated around here for? Lol

Because it's rubbish. It conveys virtually no information about the components and causes as many problems as it solves. Unless the viewer is familiar with every component and their pinouts in a Fr@#$%^& diagram, they're utterly useless.
A clear schematic is miles ahead - easy to read and conveys all necessary information - pinouts, polarities, connections, labelling, etc, etc.


Now back to your schematic - you'll need pullup resistors on the pins that connect to the float switches unless that's already incorporated into the switches. Your circuit indicates that it's not incorporated - there are no 5V connections for the switches. When the switches close the pins are pulled low, but when the switches are open, the pins are floating.

ok let's try this again, this better?

The way that is drawn, the two pins supply power to the solenoid all the time and when the transistors turn on (Q5 or Q6), they simply short the 12v to ground through the diode. The question is which will go up in smoke first - the diode, the transistor or the trace?