220V rgb led strip (...)

Hey everyone.
Im in a bit of a soup here, I locally bought a rgb led strip to control with arduino over ir.

Anyways, the strip seems to be of 220V!, actually 220V, not 12v. That means actually 220V of current go into the thing!

I looked online and it seems like they run on 220V dc.
For some reason, i bought them like 500miles from my house. So i would prefer to not burn them…

Can anyone tell me what these run on?

I plan to control the rgb strip with 13003 transistor and arduino. These can handle upto 600V.

I'd be very surprised if they run on 220VDC (or even 240VDC as it shows on that photo). Maybe 24VDC? Do you have a PSU with a variable output? Connect it and slowly turn the voltage up.

I don't believe it either. :wink:

It's possible to make a "Christmas light" string with 100 LEDs in series with ~2V dropped across each one (plus a diode and series resistor, etc.), but it doesn't look like that's what you've got.

It's up to you if you want to play-around and try to use the thing or start-over with an LED strip from a reliable supplier that gives you a datasheet and specs, etc.

I plan to control the rgb strip with 13003 transistor and arduino. These can handle upto 600V.

A single transistor won't work with AC. (Typically you use a relay or TRIAC.)

Plus, the Arduino (and yourself, and your computer, etc.) MUST ELECTRICALLY ISOLATED FROM LETHAL VOLTAGES (usually with an optical isolator).

Most of the 5050-60 LED strips I see on Google are 12-24VDC.

https://www.ledcoollights.com/product-page/led-tape-light-5050-300-leds-roll-1

PerryBebbington:

I'd be very surprised if they run on 220VDC (or even 240VDC as it shows on that photo). Maybe 24VDC? Do you have a PSU with a variable output? Connect it and slowly turn the voltage up.

Surprisingly enough, the lights are marked 220-240 VAC. AC, not DC.

I dont have a variable power supply.

DVDdoug:
I don't believe it either. :wink:

It's up to you if you want to play-around and try to use the thing or start-over with an LED strip from a reliable supplier that gives you a datasheet and specs, etc.
A single transistor won't work with AC. (Typically you use a relay or TRIAC.)

Plus, the Arduino (and yourself, and your computer, etc.) MUST ELECTRICALLY ISOLATED FROM LETHAL VOLTAGES (usually with an optical isolator).

Mutual agreement!
I think i would like to see if this works or not. Its bit of a challenge. Anyways, i can buy a controller from them, but thats not the point. I bought something i dont properly understand but i would very much like to learn.

I chose the transistors given they run on 240V DC. Not ac.

Im not keen to die yet, but i triggered a circuit breaker 3 times trying to run a broken power supply ( not connected to led).
Yes, i would be sure to take precautions..

bigred1212:
Most of the 5050-60 LED strips I see on Google are 12-24VDC.

https://www.ledcoollights.com/product-page/led-tape-light-5050-300-leds-roll-1

I tried putting 12V dc through them, doesnt work.

Moreover, the smd resistors inside seems to be 1.2kohm. My math is not strong, and i dont know how these are connected, can someone figure out what current these conduct at which voltage?
Theoretically, the smd resistors decide what voltage the strip runs on.

kaseftamjid:
Theoretically, the smd resistors decide what voltage the strip runs on.

Working voltage of all the LEDs in a string sets the voltage threshold.
The resistor sets the current.

There could be six LEDs in series (two 3-LED 5050 chips per segment).
The LEDs should start to glow from about 12volt (look in the dark).
Strip could still be 24volt, with the 1k2 resistor setting it to ~5mA@24volt.
Leo..

Since ~220V strips really do exist, that may be indeed what the OP has.

Can anyone say if this has a ferrite or a small isolation transformer?

Personally I wouldn't try to mess with that strip.

arduarn:
Since ~220V strips really do exist, that may be indeed what the OP has.

Can anyone say if this has a ferrite or a small isolation transformer?

I'm not convinced that strip runs of 240VAC. I think the thing in the middle of the mains cable is a mains to some low voltage converter, so the strip itself does not run off a high voltage. However, maybe someone has some and can state for certain one way or the other.

arduarn could be right.
Look at the numbering of the LEDs on OP's picture.
D3 to D8, without any cut points.
Low voltage LEDs have frequent cut points.
The link to the 240volt strips have cut points every meter.
Leo..

Wawa:
arduarn could be right.
Look at the numbering of the LEDs on OP's picture.
D3 to D8, without any cut points.
Low voltage LEDs have frequent cut points.
The link to the 240volt strips have cut points every meter.
Leo..

Yes, the led strip i have does have cut points every meter

That's an interesting strip indeed. Marked AC22V0-240V and I can also see 50-60Hz on them. Yet one resistor per two LEDs, as it's RGB that would be one resistor for every 6 LEDs. The resistors are 1k2 alright, 10 mA means 12V drop over that resistor plus 12V for the 6 LEDs is consistent with a 24V drive. Or a much higher voltage even, pulsed.

I guess this strip is supposed to be used with a specially designed controller. It is quite certainly not your run-of-the-mill RGB strip. Your multimeter may be able to give you a few more clues on how everything is wired, by measuring resistance (in both directions!) between the connections.

Hi,
Can you post a link to where you purchased the strips please?

Thanks.. Tom... :slight_smile:

TomGeorge:
Hi,
Can you post a link to where you purchased the strips please?

Thanks.. Tom... :slight_smile:

Im sorry, they were bought locally on whole sale

wvmarle:
That's an interesting strip indeed. Marked AC22V0-240V and I can also see 50-60Hz on them. Yet one resistor per two LEDs, as it's RGB that would be one resistor for every 6 LEDs. The resistors are 1k2 alright, 10 mA means 12V drop over that resistor plus 12V for the 6 LEDs is consistent with a 24V drive. Or a much higher voltage even, pulsed.

I guess this strip is supposed to be used with a specially designed controller. It is quite certainly not your run-of-the-mill RGB strip. Your multimeter may be able to give you a few more clues on how everything is wired, by measuring resistance (in both directions!) between the connections.

I am doubtful about the special microcontroller part. They are dirt cheap, 1.5 usd per meter and also 2 usd for the controller. I dont think they would mess around much at this price ( units are converted from bdt to usd)

I also checked with multimeter, but didnt see any readings...

kaseftamjid:
I am doubtful about the special microcontroller part.

At USD 2 there can very well be a microcontroller in there.

this posted link(thanks) seems to be the exact same model i have. I am saying this because i bought the remote out of curiosity and they seem simmilar.

Now that we have a viable model and source, can someone help me understand this circuit? I mean, this cannot be state secret right? They didnt invent new tech to just light a led strip..

Im currently searching online for any breakdown of simmilar controllers.?

It really doesn't surprise me that 220vac led strips exist because the popularity of led strips far exceeds the popularity of hobbyist level circuit design, prototyping and construction (including arduinos) so it makes sense that some company would provide a plug & play solution for leds. If you are sure you read 220vac
on them then that's probably correct. So what's the problem ? You didn't mention whether you have 220vac
to drive them. It that the issue ? (you don't have access to 220-240vac ?)