25 7 segment led display 24V 50 mA

Hello. I want to control a 25 led display of 7 segments which needs 24V and 50 mA each segment to light. Which arduino controller is best for this use? Do I need a multiplexer and relays in this project? Greetings from Paraguay. Claudio.

Any Arduino should be able to do this.

The driving electronics depend on the exact nature of your LED display which you have told us little about. You might have choices or you might not. Link to the data sheet please.

Thanks for your answer.
I am attaching the datasheet of one LED.

HS-40101ABX.pdf (87.4 KB)

Do you have common anode (right side), or common cathode (left side)?
Common anode is more straightforward, use a TPIC6B595 shift register per digit, no multiplexing.
I offer a board with a '328P and up to 12 shift registers per board, you’ll need to add in a current limit resistor per segment.
Shift in a 1, corresponding output turns on and sinks current thru the LED string. Can daisy chain 3 boards to drive 25 displays. Only the first board needs the 328P, the 2nd & third just get the SPI signals clock & latch signal in parallel and the data signal that is passed chip to chip.
http://crossroadsfencing.com/BobuinoRev17/index.html


Here’s couple videos driving 3 and 6 LED segment displays

The code is simple, for 25:

// time for an update?
digitalWrite (sspin, LOW);
for (x=0; x<25; x=x+1){
SPI.transfer(dataArray[x]);
}
digitalWrite (ssPin, HIGH); // outputs update on this rising edge

Common cathode - use 74HC595 to drive inputs to MIC2981 to source current to each segment, add in a current limit resistor per segment. Uses 50 parts vs the TPIC6B595, only need 25.

I am attaching the datasheet of one LED.

It is not a very good data sheet because it does not tell you the forward voltage drop of the LED. You need to know this to know the minimum voltage you can use. As each segment has 5 LEDs in series you can not run this off 5V. Assume they are red and have a forward voltage of 1.7V per LED then you need at least 5 * 1.7 = 8V plus a bit of overhead for the resistor so that will be a minimum of 9V. Most likely these are designed to be run off 12V. Therefore you will need a 12V power supply and drive the LEDs with that.

The other choice you have is do you want them to display without any software intervention, in which case you need an output per LED, so that is eight per display. Or you can multiplex them, this takes software or a hardware chip and only needs 8 output bits to drive them, plus one for each display.

Using a TPIC6B595 with a common anode display will not require any extra drive transistors.

These boards use a chip of the TPIC6 shift register/driver family (same as mentioned by CrossRoads and Grumpy_Mike).

https://www.sparkfun.com/products/13279

One board per 7-segment is all you need. Daisy-chain as many as you want. Leo..

Thanks for your answers. The LEDs where tested from 3,5 V to 12 V in each pin without lighting any segment, only 24 V did light a segment and it consumed around 50 mA. Edit: They are common cathode.

claudiobp: The LEDs where tested from 3,5 V to 12 V in each pin without lighting any segment, only 24 V did light a segment

and it consumed around 50 mA.

They are common cathode.

The link shows 5 LEDs in series per segment. That should be a Vf (working voltage) of 5 * ~2.4volt = ~12volt for red, and 5 * ~3.3volt = ~16.5volt for other colours. Note that the DP (point) only has one LED.

NEVER connect a LED without current limiting (resistor) to a constant voltage supply. What it "consumes" depends on the current limiting, not on the LED. 20mA could be the max safe value.

Can't use the TPIC chip for common cahode displays. Your setup will get way more complicated with CC displays. Leo..