5W or 10W Led Driver for RGB

Hello, i’m looking to run many high power (5 or 10W) RGB leds
I know I will need a driver but I don’t want to spend 5$ each if I will need many and even further, I don’t want to spend the money to find out it wont work. Henceforth i’m here asking.

the specs are attached below, just keep in mind I want to drive 10 of these.

CREE LED.png

Do you want to control each of the four colors? Do you want separate control on each of the ten packages?

You can use an LM317 linear voltage regulator as a current regulator. You can get then for about $0.25 in quantity 100 via eBay. You just need a resistor to pick the current.

johnwasser:
You can use an LM317 linear voltage regulator as a current regulator.

Erm, I must respectfully disagree. 10W is a LOT for a linear regulator! It will waste a lot of power and generate a lot of heat, you're probably going to need a serious heat sink on it.

Your other question still stands though -- does OP need to individually control the LEDs, or can he string them in series to reduce the number of drivers needed?

yes I need to be able to control each individually using max 2 at one time.
red, blue, green, White, or amber (red +green)

So, you have a few options. My favorite go-to driver is a BuckPuck, but at US$14/ea times 40, it's a spendy option. I see that Chinese exporters sell drivers for under $2/ea, but I don't see any way to control them programmatically besides using a big transistor (more $$$) to turn the power on and off. To control them without a transistor, you'd have to reverse engineer them and hope there's an enable pin on the IC. You said you didn't want to fool around with something that might not work, so, I think that's out.

Johnwasser's linear suggestion makes a little more sense now that I see that those LEDs are not 10W for each emitter, but are only ~2.6W per emitter. That's a little more reasonable to drive with a linear, though still wasteful, but perhaps cost is an overriding concern in this case. John, is it safe to assume that the linear regulator can double as a logic-level switch by pulling the set resistor to VCC or to ground with an Arduino or shift register pin (just sinking or sourcing a few mA)?

so what EXACTLY do i need and how does it need to be wired? (im pretty good with the circuit drawings so that's okay )
thanks again guys

and an update i want to run THESE!!
http://www.ebay.com/itm/10pc-10W-10-watt-rgb-High-Power-LED-Light-Lamp-Chip-Lamp-Light/301301101063?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D24351%26meid%3D43c3be8b36304b66bfe1716c8aead813%26pid%3D100005%26prg%3D10335%26rk%3D6%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D251347076742&rt=nc

Specifications:
Model : 10W
Color: RGB
DC Forward Voltage (VF): Red 6-8V, Green 9-12V, Blue 9-12V
DC Forward current (IF): 300MA
Out put Lumens: Red 120-150LM, Green 200-300LM, Blue 70-100LM
Wave Length : Red 620-625nm , Green 515-520nm, Blue 455-460nm
Beam Angel: 140 degrees
Life span: >50,000 hours

cminke, you need to tell us:

  1. What kind of power supply you are using. Voltage, amps.
  2. What power level you want to drive these to (maybe if you told us what you are using these for, we can suggest an amperage for your application).
  3. Depending on #2, if cheap, hot, power-hungry linear drivers are acceptable or if you want more efficient (and more expensive) buck drivers
  4. If you want to be able to dim/fade, or just switch the LEDs fully on and off

tylernt:
cminke, you need to tell us:

  1. What kind of power supply you are using. Voltage, amps.
  2. What power level you want to drive these to (maybe if you told us what you are using these for, we can suggest an amperage for your application).
  3. Depending on #2, if cheap, hot, power-hungry linear drivers are acceptable or if you want more efficient (and more expensive) buck drivers
  4. If you want to be able to dim/fade, or just switch the LEDs fully on and off
  1. 12VDC (car battery)
  2. LED light bar, needs to be as bright as possible
  3. ill look at both if you give me the names to look for for my specific need, keep in mind they are going to be flashing most of the time not steady burn
  4. only 1/2 dim and 1/4 dim upon a push button input

Ok, based on those criteria, including the fact that you now want to use LEDs with higher voltage and lower current, the LM317 becomes somewhat reasonable. LM317 / LM338 / LM350 Current Regulator Calculator and Circuits says you want a 1-watt, 4.3? resistor. However, I don't know if you can switch the LM317 on and off easily in this scheme with an Arduino logic level pin. Unless johnwasser knows a trick, you might have to just switch a logic-level MOSFET on each LM317 input.

I would try 30 LM317 regulators as current regulators on the anode sides and 30 logic-level N-Channel MOSFETs on the Cathode sides. I think the MOSFETs should not be too expensive: probably under $1 each. DigiKey has lots of choices.

You can go for this AMC7135 350mA Advanced Current Regulators if you can handle SMD, you can get 100 pcs for about US$11 at Here

This is how you can use it for higher voltage

You can control the VDD pin with P -channel MOSFET Arduino digital out pin directly for PWM

okay i'm kinda understanding, but where i'm lost is the PWM, I don't understand how that cant control specific led's in a line.
what IM CURRENTLY doing is using one pin for each led from the arduino and programming each individually using a Mosfet to act as a switch(smaller W leds right now on a different project),

my understanding is its similar to this but i just need a different mosfet/ controller that can handle the higher Wattage.

please try to explain it to me so i can put it together in my mind. Thanks for all the help guys its a huge learning experience for me !!

cminke:
3) ill look at both if you give me the names to look for for my specific need, keep in mind they are going to be flashing most of the time not steady burn
4) only 1/2 dim and 1/4 dim upon a push button input

When you said you need the LED flashing and dim, in arduino you have to used PWM, AnalogWrite() function.

With AMC7135 you don't need MOSFET, you can control using Arduino digital out pin directly like this

This circuit show using 3 AMC7135 for higher current of about 1A, you don't need that you will driving it only 300mA.

how many can i control from 1 PWM pin? i only have limited ammount on my arduino. if you can help me lean how to individualy control leds using minimal outputs from the arduino that would be awesome

cminke:
how many can i control from 1 PWM pin?

Exactly one.

Do get more outputs, use shift registers and the ShiftPWM library.

You also can use PWM hardware IC.
For example, something like the TLC5940 offers 16 channel PWM control.
http://playground.arduino.cc/learning/TLC5940

how can I adjust the dimness and colour or each rgb led? is there an example?
im using the led driver that i have included below. is this okay to use? and will it work using a pwm in from the TLC?

To drive that all you need is 3pwm ports… each one to it’s own rgb.

(But what’s on the other side?.. ) hopefully each transistor turns on via it’s base and draws a small amount of current < 40ma)

cjdelphi:
(But what’s on the other side?.. ) hopefully each transistor turns on via it’s base and draws a small amount of current < 40ma)

Exactly, the photo is helpful but we need a link to product specifications… preferably a datasheet.