6 axis robot arm basic set up

Hi,

I am new to this so forgive me in advance. I recently purchased a R5 6 axis robot arm off of a ebay along with a 880 slot breadboard and a UNO R3 board. I also have a universal power adapter that I would like to split to connect to the breadboard as an external power source. I haven't received everything yet but I would have it planned in advanced.

  1. Will my set up work?

I will have the universal power adapter set to 6v and stripped to expose the positive and negative. This will be connected to my breadboard's + and GND.

There will be a GND cable from the breadboard to the Arduino. I think I should have the USB plugged in to supply the Arduino while the universal power adapter is acting as an external power source. Is this correct? or should I be using 9v batteries like I see in examples?

The Servos of the Arm will be connected to the GND and + terminals of the breadboard as well as the PWM slots of the Arduino.

  1. I also want to set up the arm to be teachable.

(Ex. Teach 'Arduino 6-axis robot arm' new positions with your hands (recording and playing back) - YouTube)

What does it mean to connect the Center pins of the servo potentiometers to the arduino analog input pins? Are there other ways to make the arm teachable?

Thank you for any help.

or should I be using 9v batteries like I see in examples?

If you have wall power, why would you even consider batteries?

Keep in mind that your breadboard may have 2 power rails and two ground rails (or even 4, depending on how big it is).

What does it mean to connect the Center pins of the servo potentiometers to the arduino analog input pins?

How else is the Arduino supposed to know where the servo is? That is, how is it supposed to know where a joint is?

GGMechanics:
2) I also want to set up the arm to be teachable.

Standard RC servos do not support this, since they do not have readable feedback to the arduino about their position.
The servos in your example video have been modified. They have been opened, and a wire soldered to the internal pot.
This allows the Arduino to read the positions of the servos during the teaching mode. You will need an input pin for every servo. And some delicate soldering skills.
The good news is that the servos are cheap so if you brick it trying to add the feedback, you can get replacements. If it were me, I would pre-order the replacements.

Are there other ways to make the arm teachable?

Yes, by giving the operator a way to move the arm through code. When they have adjusted the position of each servo to their satisfaction, they hit a learn button and the arm remembers that position.

Here is a video that shows the user adjusting position through some user interface. There is even an LED on the arm to confirm that the position has been 'learned'.

GGMechanics:
What does it mean to connect the Center pins of the servo potentiometers to the arduino analog input pins?

The center pin provides the varying voltage (potentiometer wiper) which indicates the position of the servo. This voltage is digitized and recorded in teach mode and then 'played back' to the servo to drive it to the recorded position in run mode.

vinceherman:
Yes, by giving the operator a way to move the arm through code. When they have adjusted the position of each servo to their satisfaction, they hit a learn button and the arm remembers that position.

Here is a video that shows the user adjusting position through some user interface. There is even an LED on the arm to confirm that the position has been 'learned'.
- YouTube

So, if I were to mimic this set up would I need to add potentiometers and bluetooth?

Some UI, certainly.
Anything that will let you set each servo and then record the arm position.

Probably a button to record.
It could be a pot for each servo
It could be + and - button for each servo.
It could be one + and - button set to select the current servo and another + and - set to move that servo.
It could be a wheel dohickey like from a mouse to move the servo.

Edit: it could be keys from your computer keyboard if you are going to be connected.

Here is another way to "self teach" or program your arm.

Our pick-and-place machines and our selective solder machine are all programmed using using the teach method.

A video camera with cross hairs is permanently attached to the moving head. The machine knows exactly where the camera cross hairs are located X and Y form the actual pickup head or solder fountain. The operator programs by moving the camera using the keyboard from location to location and tells the computer when it is centered at the next location. there is lots more to the programming, but that is the basics of moving from location to location.

Your equipment has more degrees of freedom, so cameras may be a bit more complex, but they are very small.

Paul

vinceherman:
Some UI, certainly.
Anything that will let you set each servo and then record the arm position.

Probably a button to record.
It could be a pot for each servo
It could be + and - button for each servo.
It could be one + and - button set to select the current servo and another + and - set to move that servo.
It could be a wheel dohickey like from a mouse to move the servo.

Edit: it could be keys from your computer keyboard if you are going to be connected.

If I am hooked up through USB, can I do this without extra hardware and have it coded in?

Btw, Thank you. very helpful posts.