Arduino + Bluetooth + iOS

I'm trying to get some sensor data (from a sensor connected to an Arduino) into iOS for display.

I have a very general question: what format is the data arriving into iOS as? Is it dependent on the sensor output? ASCII?

As an example, if I have a temperature sensor reading temperature every 30-seconds, how can I display this "real-time" temperature read in iOS

Note: Not asking OS-specific programming questions - just want to know how this data is transmitted from the Bluetooth 4.0 shield.

PS - Any recommendations for a small and great quality Bluetooth 4.0 Sheild for Arduino?

Thanks!!

dakrisht:
what format is the data arriving into iOS as?

Depends on the bluetooth profile

dakrisht:
from the Bluetooth 4.0 shield.

“the” shield? What is “the” shield?

dakrisht: Note: Not asking OS-specific programming questions -

I think you should be. There was comment here about this a couple of weeks ago, and I seem to recall "waste of time" were the operative words.

Apple is not so friendly with non-apple stuff and I believe you should carefully research the need and means to make it more so. You might find that investing a few bucks in something Android will get the same result with a lot less grief.

It’s not difficult to connect to a Bluetooth 4.0 device with iOS. In fact, it’s probably easier that with Android, at least for now. It’s possible with either a Bluetooth Shield like the Redbear Labs BLE Shield or with a WiFi to serial bridge like the WiFly.

Here are a couple of resources for getting started with the WiFly bridge idea. The first is a blog that shows how to connect to an Arduino from an iOS device using the WiFly bridge.

http://www.byteworks.us/Byte_Works/Blog/Entries/2013/9/11_Connecting_to_an_Arduino_with_and_iPhone_or_iPad.html

The blog was created to support this webcast; you can still watch the archive:

I have not had a chance yet to create a blog showing how to use the Redbear BLE Shield from an Arduino, but you can find the information in the book, Building iPhone and iPad Electronic Projects, from O’Reilly:

The book has a pretty fun project with the Arduino. You’ll see how to hack a cheap radio control truck, improving it’s performance and controlling it by tipping an iPhone. There are also lots of other projects, although many deal directly with BLE devices like thermometers, accelerometers and so forth; these don’t use an Arduino.

mikew50:
It’s not difficult to connect to a Bluetooth 4.0 device with iOS.

It needs to be understand that the emphasis here is Bluetooth 4.0 LE. Non BT4 devices are not a simple matter to communicate with iOS. The vast majority of Bluetooth shields will not work.

This BLE Shield looks like the exception.