Arduino vs Phidgets

Hi,

I have experience with Phidgets and none with Arduino. Actually, phidgets is ALL i know, for I am a programmer without a clue programming ANY type of physical thing. I like phidgets because I can use one of my favorite languages (C++,AS3) and the direct interaction with the PC. This is also the main drawback: the computer is always needed. This makes an outdoor setup much more complicated. The arduino documentation mentiones “uploading” your program and connecting an adapter.
Does this mean you could do without the host computer after you uploaded your app?
Does this also mean you are limited in processing power, api-functions and memory usage compared to the host computer?
What about when using the BlueTooth version?

Thanks,
Micha

Once you’ve uploaded your sketch, it can function with minimum components as shown in this link

http://art364.pbwiki.com/Standalone+Arduino

The Arduino “can” send and receive data to/from a host computer. It can do so via USB, or wirelessly, like the BT.

But it isn’t dependent on a pc, it can function autonomously and control other devices without a computer, and there is no loss of api-functions or memory.

I’ve got experience with Phidgets (long since tossed) and modtronix (the method of resetting doesn’t get any harder) and the Arduino in a variety of flavors, NG / BT / Lilypad / RBBB, and can say with certainty that it’s difficult to beat the Arduino for price and ease of use.

The language is based on C/C++ so you’ll be comfortable with the IDE, and you’ll find there’s a lot more going on here in terms of what people are doing with the Arduino, than over at Phidgets or any of the others, so there’s a great deal of reference material and coding examples, plus a substantial and active international community that’s usually more than happy to help.

Hi John,

thanks for your reply.

Bare with me … I’m true n00b willing to learn. What I understand from the URL you provided:
The image at the top shows a schematic of the connections with the ATmegaXXX-chip, right?
This is probably the chip which contains the software. This chip could be transferred to “the board” after uploading the program (the “sketch”). What/Which board? (a herring?? ;D) Assuming this is a board other than the arduino board itself …
In short: arduino does not work standalone “from the box”? I was hoping on simply setting a jumper and connecting an adapter …

Hi John,

thanks for your reply.

Bare with me … I’m true n00b willing to learn. What I understand from the URL you provided:
The image at the top shows a schematic of the connections with the ATmegaXXX-chip, right?

Correct, the ATMEGA168

This is probably the chip which contains the software.

If you purchased an NG, that has the bootloader already installed. So you’d then write a program using the Arduino IDE, upload it to the NG, then you could pull the ATMEGA168 out of the NG, and use it per the bare-bones circuit - if you wanted to. The circuit simply illustrates that you don’t need lots of components to use a ATMEGA168

This chip could be transferred to “the board” after uploading the program (the “sketch”).

In the case of an NG, the ATMEGA168 is already on the board. So per above, you use the NG then can pull the chip out, in response to your original question “Does this mean you could do without the host computer after you uploaded your app?” - yes, you can do without the host computer and to further elaborate, the board too.

What/Which board? (a herring?? ;D) Assuming this is a board other than the arduino board itself …
In short: arduino does not work standalone “from the box”? I was hoping on simply setting a jumper and connecting an adapter …

Yes, the Arduino works as a standalone “out of the box”, or “OTS”.

What would you be using a jumper/adapter for?

Hi John,

your last reply is very helpful … you got the answer i needed. :sunglasses:

Hi John,
(…)
What would you be using a jumper/adapter for?

Just something I read on a tutorial site …
bottom of the page:
Arduino Tutorial - Getting ready

The USB cable connects the NG to the computer. You’ll be wanting the NG connected to the computer to upload sketches, and if there’s serial over USB communications with a host computer required, then that’s your cable.

The USB provides power also, so you don’t need to use an alternative power supply via any of the adapter cables shown.

Once you’ve uploaded your sketch, you might not need the USB if there isn’t the need to communicate with a host computer. In that case, you can use a wall adapter to power the NG, or you can use a 9v battery adapter.

With the BT, you don’t need any cables at all, just a battery like a 3.7v Poly Li Ion cell connected by wires (+ / GND) to the BT’s terminal block.