Battery operated Arduino question

Not sure how this works yet but I’ve been reading up alot on it and want to make sure I have the right idea.

I want my LEDs to be battery operated I don’t want a huge cable running from my ceiling to my wall plug

Can I attach a 12v battery to the VIN and ground while connecting an led to the 5v??

Is that correct or am I wrong?

Also how can I communicate the device to Alexa.

Thanks guys

Yes you can run off a 12v battery and use the 5v as per your Idea1.jpg

There is a limit to the amount of power you can get from the onboard 5v regulator without it overheating, but one of those LEDs should be fine. More than 3 or 4 of them would be a problem.

With one of those tiny 12v batteries are around 50mAh, so it could roughly supply 55mA for one hour.

Yours, TonyWilk

Hmm, the idea1 was just cut short so I could explain it easier, so how could I extend the life of the LED and also power more than 6 feet of LEDS for my ceiling

I guess the only way would be to connect it to an outlet

I really want to make this wireless what is the best way to do so with a longer life?

Oooh... 6 feet of LEDS, looks like those addressable LED strips, that's going to be a lot of power, probably several AMPS.

A small battery simply won't give out that amount of current and, if it did, the 5v regulator on the Arduino board would go POOF almost immediately.

By far the simplest solution would be a 5v plugtop power supply which can supply enough current for your LED strip - you'll have to check how much current the strip you have will need.

like: Power-Supply-Adapter-Transformer-LED-Strip

You'll also need some thick cable to wire from the power supply to your Arduino and strip, powering the Arduino 5v and the LED 5v from that.

If you really want a battery, it would have to be a big one like: 12v-7ah-BATTERY which you can wire to Arduino Vin and you'll need a 12v to 5v converter (again, to supply several amps) to power the LEDS.

Yours, TonyWilk

Mikephoenix28: I really want to make this wireless what is the best way to do so with a longer life?

Big batteries, like big LiPos used for big RC vehicles. Illumination takes a significant amount of power, and some LED strips can draw a couple amps of current per meter. Illumination takes a lot of power and there's no way around that.

If it's a stationary installation, just plug it in! Wireless only makes sense if you want it to be portable.

Thanks guys for all your help,

I never went to school for this but im trying to understand the basics and I don't want to ruin my equipment

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06XNJSKXN/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?smid=A2L77EE7U53NWQ&psc=1

Those are the LEDS I am purchasing

I am open to plugging them into the wall So to power the Arduino nano I will need a 5v power supply? The Nano has a USB plug not the circle one

could I find the usb wall plug thing If so can you please link it

Next once I have power going into the arduino I can attach the LED to the 5v and ground and will it successfully power a 6foot strip?

after I get the LEDS working I will learn how to program stuff and I guess thatll lead to my next project that ill ask in the project section of this forum

That strip seems to have about 18 LEDs per foot, each LED can take upto 60mA (0.06A), so each foot will take just over 1A.

For a 5ft strip you will need at least a 6amp 5v power supply.

The link you gave was for 16.4ft with 300 LEDs, this would take 18 Amps. That’s quite a lot.

Mikephoenix28:

Next once I have power going into the arduino I can attach the LED to the 5v and ground and will it successfully power a 6foot strip?

You don’t want the power for the LEDs going through the Arduino tho, see attached picture

Yours,
TonyWilk

Wow thank you that literally connected the dots for me

The link was for a 16 foot one but I intend on cutting it all over the place lol

I should be all set now

Mikephoenix28: Wow thank you that literally connected the dots for me

The link was for a 16 foot one but I intend on cutting it all over the place lol

I should be all set now

Doesn't matter how much you split it up, the total power of all the pieces combined will still add up to the same amount.

Jiggy-Ninja: Doesn't matter how much you split it up, the total power of all the pieces combined will still add up to the same amount.

so if I cut one strip that's 6 feet long connect it to its own power source it will be 18amps

then cut another piece that's only 3 feet and put it in a different place with a separate power source it will also be 18 amps?

Or am I correct in thinking that 6 feet = 6.48amps (needing 6a 5v plug)

and 3feet = 3.24 amp (needing 3a 5v plug)

10 feet = 10.8amps (needing 10a 5v plug)

Thanks for the info -Mike

Mikephoenix28: Or am I correct in thinking that 6 feet = 6.48amps (needing 6a 5v plug)

and 3feet = 3.24 amp (needing 3a 5v plug)

10 feet = 10.8amps (needing 10a 5v plug)

Your calculations are correct.

Although if you calculate you need 10.8amps, a 10a 5v plug won't quite be enough at full power.

Usually it's best to calculate the power you need and add a bit to select the power supply - you don't want it running flat out, getting hot and maybe not quite outputting the full 5 volts.

So, for 10.8amps go for a 12amp supply or higher.

Yours, TonyWilk