Can I use tin with flux to solder?

I did some research on soldering and found that most people recommend using a 60% tin and 40% lead alloy to solder, but can I just use tin with flux?
Thanks in advance!

but can I just use tin with flux?

Is that the flux used for soldering tin plate?
If so you can use it but it will corrode your electronic components over time.

Grumpy_Mike:
Is that the flux used for soldering tin plate?
If so you can use it but it will corrode your electronic components over time.

No the solder with be the tin with a rosin flux core.

Please post a link to this "solder with be the tin with a rosin flux core". It doesn't sound like anything I've ever seen in a lot of years of electronics.

Are you perhaps talking about "Lead-free solder"? That isn't just tin. Most of it is tin+silver+copper though there are other variants. It can work but is generally not as good as standard 60/40 solder for hand soldering.

Steve

slipstick:
Are you perhaps talking about “Lead-free solder”? That isn’t just tin. Most of it is tin+silver+copper though there are other variants. It can work but is generally not as good as standard 60/40 solder for hand soldering.

Yes I was, oops. I already ordered 60/40 solder so posting a link doesn’t matter anymore since I’d have to search for it again. Thanks for your help!

slipstick:
Please post a link to this "solder with be the tin with a rosin flux core". It doesn't sound like anything I've ever seen in a lot of years of electronics.

Are you perhaps talking about "Lead-free solder"? That isn't just tin. Most of it is tin+silver+copper though there are other variants. It can work but is generally not as good as standard 60/40 solder for hand soldering.

Steve

The most usable solder for hand-soldering is a eutectic, which means the lead-free stuff with 4% silver (*),
which is perfectly usable, though more expensive than the tin/copper version (which is non-eutectic
so a nightmare to rework).

Pure tin is available as a solder, although I've never used it, being a pure metal it will be as workable as
any eutectic. Eutectics melt at a single temperature so don't have a pasty range.

Incidentally 60/40 isn't eutectic, 63/37 is, and is to be prefered over 60/40 (probably only a small
change in observable behaviour.

(*) about 1% CU, 4% Ag, remainder Sn

Using lead-free solder myself, works great - 0.5% Ag in it, also some Cu. Took a little getting used to, but when I worked with old-fashioned leaded solder I had the same problem... it just melts a little differently.

To answer the original post. Yes, you can solder with pure tin. BUT, you need a really aggressive organic flux to clean what you are soldering. The flux must activate at the temperature you are using to solder. If you iron is too hot, the flux vaporizes. Too cool and it won't do it's cleaning job.

When all done, the joint MUST be washed clean of all flux.

Paul

wvmarle:
Using lead-free solder myself, works great - 0.5% Ag in it, also some Cu. Took a little getting used to, but when I worked with old-fashioned leaded solder I had the same problem... it just melts a little differently.

No, that's not eutectic, you need about 4% silver for euctectic point. Your stuff I'd guess is pasty on rework, rather than melting nicely.

Lead-free isn't a fashion, its to prevent lead polution of drinking water due to leaching from land-fill sites.

MarkT:
No, that's not eutectic, you need about 4% silver for euctectic point. Your stuff I'd guess is pasty on rework, rather than melting nicely.

True, that's a bit of an issue at times. Some solder paste helps a lot to get it going, but then I always end up with some sticky, greasy mess. 4% silver sounds quite expensive, the stuff I use is already quite a bit more expensive than the 60/40 solder. But it's got no lead, that's a good thing. Way too much of that in the environment already.

So the best thing to do is just to it correct the first way around :slight_smile:

MarkT:
No, that's not eutectic, you need about 4% silver for euctectic point. Your stuff I'd guess is pasty on rework, rather than melting nicely.

Lead-free isn't a fashion, its to prevent lead polution of drinking water due to leaching from land-fill sites.

Actually, lead in drinking water comes from the leaded brass fixtures in the water line. Like the bathroom faucet. Leaded brass in water fixtures are banned in California. Local schools have spent millions replacing the leaded brass in their water fountains.

Paul

Leaded pipes are a major issue indeed. Leaded car fuel was another major contributor to lead in the environment (and it's going to take a very long time before that's all gone).

MarkT:
Lead-free isn't a fashion, its to prevent lead polution of drinking water due to leaching from land-fill sites.

MarkT, that is absolute bollocks. As well you know, or should do if you bothered to read any of the research done on this topic or know anything about chemistry.

Well. If somebody is really thinking about pure tin you should know this. It is not good because pure tin will grow so called tin whiskers, which will short things. And pure tin will rot in a cold environment. That is tin pest. But you probably wont find pure tin as solder anyway.