Data Transmission Through Power Line

I am a beginner to Arduino. I want to transmit data through the power line. I try to do many things by watching youtube videos but I couldn't reach my target. the project is as follows

I capture images using the Arduino camera module ( OV7670 ) then I want to transmit them through the power line. for that, I use the KQ-330 power line carrier communication module. currently, I can capture the image and save it on pc, but I can't send it through a power line to another Arduino board. so I use Arduino Uno and Nano boards. I haven't any idea to do this please help me.

If it were me trying to do this I'd buy a pair of Ethernet over power adapters (available on your favourite retail web site and in shops selling computer related products) and use an Ethernet board at each end to send and receive the data.

Barely worth the effort, compared to WiFi.

What is the transmission rate using mains? Bits per second?

You say "currently, I can capture the image and save it on pc".

Just how are you doing that? What is the communication method and what else is between the camera and the PC?

a7

Railroader:
What is the transmission rate using mains? Bits per second?

100bps

20140619104969976997.zh-CN.en.pdf (557 KB)

alto777:
You say "currently, I can capture the image and save it on pc".

Just how are you doing that? What is the communication method and what else is between the camera and the PC?

a7

I do that by referring to this article it works

now I want to transmit some data from one Arduino to another through the KQ-330 power line carrier communication module. i have two modules for transmission and receiving.

Is there any reason you can't use WiFi?

I have a pair of Netgear HDX111 Powerline Ethernet Adapters that basically uses the power lines as Ethernet. It works, but the data rate is painfully slow.

The two adapters must be on the same phase of the power line. Most homes in the US have a 220V service from two secondary windings of the transformer on the pole. This is how you get 220V power for clothes dryers, air conditioning, hot tub, etc, and 110 V for everything else. Both adapters must be on the same phase because the high frequency data on the power lines cannot survive a trip through the transformer. (This was a huge headache for X-10 devices).

Also, surge-suppressor outlet strips can kill the data.

Data over power lines is a bad plan and rarely works as advertised.

Hi,
The github site says.

The actual highest carrier rate is 2400 BPS. other features are :

Not the best to tx video image data.

Can you please tell us your electronics, programming, arduino, hardware experience?

Have you googled kq330 arduino

Tom... :slight_smile:

dewruwan95:
100bps

100 bits per second... Take a look att the size of the data You want to send. Then divide that size, in bytes, by 10. That is the number of seconds needed for transmitting those data.
Maybe a thumbnail picture would work.

SteveMann:
Is there any reason you can't use WiFi?

I have a pair of Netgear HDX111 Powerline Ethernet Adapters that basically uses the power lines as Ethernet. It works, but the data rate is painfully slow.

The two adapters must be on the same phase of the power line. Most homes in the US have a 220V service from two secondary windings of the transformer on the pole. This is how you get 220V power for clothes dryers, air conditioning, hot tub, etc, and 110 V for everything else. Both adapters must be on the same phase because the high frequency data on the power lines cannot survive a trip through the transformer. (This was a huge headache for X-10 devices).

Also, surge-suppressor outlet strips can kill the data.

Data over power lines is a bad plan and rarely works as advertised.

this is basic details about KQ-330 Module
GitHub - santoshkrishnanr/KQ330-power-line-communication-: Python program on raspberry pi to communicate on power, using KQ330

It's still not at all clear to me why you are doing this.

In a brief internet search, I found the following project demonstrating one-way serial communications via KQ-330 modules using Raspberry Pi as the controllers. It looks like the KQ-330 is simply a serial bridge, so you just send bytes using regular asynchronous serial, that is Serial.write() on Arduino. This project gives only the photo for circuit documentation, but it appears that the KQ-330 accepts TTL level serial.

The project notes indicate the same 100 bps maximum throughput as noted above, so there'd have to be some rate moderation on the send side to keep from overflowing whatever buffer the KQ-330 has.

To get started, I'd just write a simple sketch that sends a repeating 0-9 count, one update per second, and see if you can get that working to prove out the data link. Encoding/decoding an image file would be the next (rather enormous) step, but clearly a separable development issue.

The bit rate is low because it is synced to the sine wave being near zero volts. At the time period, one or two bits are sent.

Paul

What is the size of the pictures that will be sent?

no in my project camera can capture images and now I can pass data through the power line. but I have another problem when combining both together. the camera module works with a 10,000,000 baud rate but the power line data communication module works with a maximum of 9600 baud rate. how can I fix this problem?

Hi,
“Ye cannae change the laws of physics”

The data rate is set by the parameters of the transmission line, in this case a power line, not designed for data transmission.
The higher the data rate, the higher the signal losses.

Did you research data over power before you bought the hardware?
As has been asked many times; What is the reason for this method of data transmission?

Thanks.. Tom... :slight_smile: