DC motor moving so slow

So I have recently started an rc car project and it was going so well until I tried it. I fixed all the bugs and errors I had except for the batteries and the speed of the dc motor. When I plugged in 4 1.5V batteries it was super slow. And I knew it was because of my batteries. So I removed my old 1.5v batteries and bought 4 new ones (save voltage though which is 1.5) and I also bought a 9v battery. I plugged my 4 1.5v batteries into the arduino itself. and for the 9v battery I plugged it into the motor shield. But it was still so slow. I t might be slightly faster though. But not the speed I wanted. I tried plugging my arduino into the electricity. And it actually worked very well. But of course I can't keep it there as I need my car to move. I also tried plugging a power bank which didn't make any difference in the slow speed of the dc motors.

Now, my question is..
Am I doing anything wrong?
And can I increase the speed with the batteries I have?

If your 9V battery is a little rectangular PP3 type then it might work for the Arduino. But you need more powerful batteries for the motors. They are what takes all the current. Try 6 x 1.5V AA batteries to the motor shield.

Steve

yes it is actually rectangular. I will put it for the arduino and I will also try putting more batteries. Thanks

I don't see that you said what chip your motor shield uses, but if it's an L293 or L298 you get a significant voltage drop between what you put in and what it delivers. From memory, they lose 3V or so.

pontiacbandit:
I don't see that you said what chip your motor shield uses, but if it's an L293 or L298 you get a significant voltage drop between what you put in and what it delivers. From memory, they lose 3V or so.

Its an L293D does it still drop voltages?

First things first, what exactly is the motor? Do you have any/all details for it?

Most RC models use motors that take large currents, and must be powered from a powerful LiPo
pack and use a suitable high current ESC.

zyngot:
Its an L293D does it still drop voltages?

According to the datasheet I found (which you should get into the habit of tracking down and checking), the L293/D always drop 1.4V, and may drop as much as 1.8V.

Double that drop, that's per output pin and the motor connects to two pins... Basically these
Darlington drivers aren't really intended for low voltage operation at all, they are more realistic
for 24V or 48V circuits.

For a low voltage motor a MOSFET H-bridge is needed.

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